Seven

Seven comes from the English word for 7, a number long since considered lucky, such as the idea of a seventh son of a seventh son being lucky. It comes from Proto-Germanic *sebun derived from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥ (seven).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Advertisements

Hero

Hero is the name of a lover of Leander, a priestess of Aphrodite. They lived on opposite sides of the Hellespont and every night Leander would swim across to meet up with his lover, who would light a lamp at the top of the tower to help guide his way. One night he got caught in a storm and drowned, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowns herself in her grief. Hero is also the name of a female character in Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (1598-99). Hero is also a male name, used as the Latinized form of Heron. Both names comes from Greek element heros meaning “hero, warrior” which comes from the Proto-Indo-European root word *ser (to watch over, protect). A hero is also a word used to refer to someone who is brave and noble, the principal character in a  novel, or referring to a mythological or legendary figure or a demigod.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Female forms:

  • Iro (Modern Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Heron (Ancient Greek)

 

Alan

Alan is a male name of uncertain etymology which may possibly mean “little rock” or “noble” from Old Irish ail. It also means “beautiful, handsome” from Scottish Gaelic àlainn (beautiful, fine, splendid). Alan may also be derived from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, which may be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti meaning “to nourish, grow” from Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂el- (to grow, nourish). Alan is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Al

Origin: Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Allan (English, Scottish, Danish)
  • Allen (English, Scottish)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alain (French)
  • Alen (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Ailín (Irish)
  • Alun (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Alana (English)
  • Alanna (English)
  • Alannah (English, Irish)
  • Allana (English)
  • Alaina (English)
  • Alayna (English)
  • Alanis (English)
  • Alannis (English)

 

Chord

Chord comes from a musical term, a combination of three or more musical tones sounding simultaenously, as well as a term used in geometery referring to a straight line between two points on a curve. It comes from Latin chorda via Ancient Greek khordḗ (string of gut; cord, string) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (bowels). Chord is also a surname, perhaps a variant spelling of Cord, an occupational name for someone who was a rope-maker which also comes from the same source as Chord.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Khord (English)
  • Cord (English)

 

Septima

Septima is an Ancient Roman female, name, the feminine form of Septimus, which means “seventh” in Latin, originally used to refer to the seventh-born child or one born in the seventh month. It comes from Latin septem from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥ (seven).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Variants:

  • Septimia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Septimius (Ancient Roman)
  • Settimio (Italian)
  • Septimiu (Romanian)
  • Séptimo (Spanish)

 

Bailey

Bailey is a unisex given name which comes from an English surname with several possible meanings:

  • it’s an occupational surname meaning “bailiff”, referring to someone who was an officer of the court, similar to a sheriff or a sheriff’s deputy in charge with keeping order; it derives from Latin bāiulus (carrier, porter; manager, steward);
  • it also refers to the outermost wall of a castle which comes from Old French baille meaning “stake, palisade, brace”, perhaps derived from Latin baculum (stick, staff, scepter, rod) from Proto-Indo-European *bak- (stick);
  • it may also be a locational surname meaning “berry wood”, referring to someone who lived near such a place, from Old English beg (berry) and leah (woodland).

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Bailee (English)
  • Baylee (English)
  • Baylie (English)

 

Matilda

Matilda comes from Old German Mahthildis meaning “strength in battle” or “might in battle” from Germanic elements maht (might, strength) which comes from Proto-Indo-European root word *megʰ- (to be able), and hild (battle) which also comes from a Proto-Indo-European root word.

Nicknames: Mattie/Matty, Tilda, Tildy, Tilly/Tillie

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Mahthildis (Ancient Germanic)
  • Mathilda (English, Swedish, Ancient Germanic)
  • Matylda (Czech, Polish)
  • Maud (English, Dutch)
  • Maude (English)
  • Maudie (English)
  • Mathilde (French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Machteld (Dutch)
  • Mechteld (Dutch)
  • Mahaut (Medieval French)
  • Mechthild (German)
  • Mechthilde (German)
  • Matild (Hungarian)
  • Mafalda (Italian, Portuguese)
  • Matilde (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Mallt (Welsh)

 

Dorian

Dorian comes from the name of an ancient Greek tribe called the Dorians. According to mythology, they got their name from their founder, Dorus, which at first glance seems related to Greek doron meaning “gift” from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃rom (gift) from the root *deh₃- (to give). However, the exact origins of the name are not uncertain. It’s possible Dorian also derives from Proto-Indo-European *doru- meaning “tree, wood”, the same root word for “spear” in Greek as well. Dorian is also a surname, an anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deoradháin meaning “descendant of Deoradhán”, the latter derived from Old Irish deoradh meaning “exile, wanderer, stranger, pilgrim”.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Dorieus (Ancient Greek)
  • Dorijan (Croatian)
  • Doriano (Italian)
  • Dorián (Hungarian)
  • Doran (Irish)

 

Female forms:

  • Doriane (French)
  • Doriana (Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Croatian, Portuguese)
  • Doria (English)

 

Lykos

Lykos is an Ancient Greek male name meaning “wolf” from Greek lukos (wolf) derived from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos (wolf), making it a cognate of Latin lupusOld English wulf, and Russian volk. Lykos is the name of several figures in Greek mythology.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Lycus (Latinized Greek)

 

Anna-Maria

Anna-Maria is a female given name, a combination of Anna and Maria:

  • Anna is the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • Maria comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr“love”. Maria is also the feminine form of Marius, a Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it’s possible that Mars was derived from an older source, perhaps from from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture) of unknown meaning. Mars could also be the contracted form of an older name, Mavors (or Mavort) which could come from Latin verb mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn), essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same  Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Annamaria (Italian, English)
  • Annamária (Hungarian)
  • Annemarie (Dutch, German)
  • Annmarie (English)