Korus

Korus could be a variant spelling of Chorus, a word referring to a group of people singing in unison. It comes from Latin chorus derived from Ancient Greek khorós meaning "ring dance, round dance; band, troop" perhaps derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning, perhaps from *gher- (1) (to enclose) or *gher- (2) (to like, want). Korus is also a Latvian word, … Continue reading Korus

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Fulla

Fulla (also known as Volla) is the name of a goddess in Norse mythology, a hand-maiden of Frigg. Her name is of uncertain origin and meaning. It may be related to Old Norse fullr meaning "full" and essentially meaning "bountiful", derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word *pleh₁- (to fill); or from Old Norse fyl meaning "foal" derived from Proto-Germanic *fulją. Fulla is also a Catalan … Continue reading Fulla

Arnold

Arnold comes from a Germanic name meaning "eagle power" from Germanic elements arn (eagle) derived from Proto-Germani *arô via Proto-Indo-European *h₃érō (eagle); and wald (power, leader, ruler) from Proto-Germanic *waldaną (to rule) also derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). It was used as a cognate of Anglo-Saxon name Earnweald also meaning "eagle power" from Old English elements earn (eagle) and weald (power, might) eventually replacing it. Arnold … Continue reading Arnold

Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a … Continue reading Cerelia

Trey

Trey came about s a nickname for someone who was a third child or usually the third of their name, which comes from Old French treis meaning "three" derived from Latin trēs (three) via Proto-Indo-European *tréyes (three). In cards or dice a trey refers to having a rank of three. Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Brett

Brett comes from an English surname meaning "Breton", originally used to refer to someone who came from Brittany though it may also have been given to the Celtic inhabitants of Strathclyde, Scotland, who were called Bryttas/Brettas up until the 14th century. Brett is also a German word meaning "plank, board, shelf, tray" which comes from Proto-Germanic *burdą (board, … Continue reading Brett

Peregrine

Peregrine is the English form of Late Latin Peregrinus which means "traveler, foreigner" from Latin peregrē (foreign, abroad) made up from Latin per (through, by means of) deriving from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to go over); and ager (field, farm) also derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field, pasturage). Peregrine is also a surname usually given to those who went on a pilgrimage so it also connotes the idea of a "pilgrim". It's … Continue reading Peregrine

Everly

Everly comes from an English surname derived from a place name. It means "wild boar clearing" from Old English eofor (wild boar; boar) and lēah (woodland, clearing, meadow) which comes from Proto-Germanic *lauhaz (clearing, meadow) derived from Proto-Indo-European *lowkos- (clearing, open space), a cognate of Latin lūcus (sacred grove, wood). Origin: Old English, Proto-Indo-European Variants: Everley (English) Everleigh (English)  

Bloom

Bloom conjures up images of blooming flowers, something in the process of opening up and blossoming. It comes from Middle Low German blōme (to bloom, flower, blossom) from Proto-Germanic *blōmô (flower) which ultimately derives from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (to bloom, to flower, to thrive). As a word it's also used to refer to someone in the 'bloom' of youth, someone who's flourishing … Continue reading Bloom

Haven

Haven comes from an English word referring to a harbor or port, or any place that is used as a refuge or shelter. Basically it connotes a sense of safety and shelter. The word comes from Old English hæfen meaning "inlet; harbor, port" derived from Proto-Germanic *habnō (harbor; haven) related to Proto-Germanic *habą meaning "sea" from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to seize; to grab). … Continue reading Haven