Caledon

Caledon seems to be a shortened form of Caledonia, the old Latin name for Scotland in the northern part of Britain. Apparently the name is derived from a Pictish tribe in northern Scotland called the Caledonii which could be related to Proto-Celtic word *kaletos- meaning “hard/hardy, tough” from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard), perhaps in reference to the rocky land of the area or to the people. Caledon is also a surname derived from a place name, likely referring to someone who came from a town called Caledon.

Nicknames: Cal, Cale

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Female forms:

  • Caledonia

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Gentiana

Gentiana is the name of a genus of flowering plants, as well as also being the strictly feminine form of Gentian, derived from the given name Gentius which seems to have gotten its name from an Illyrian king supposedly because he discovered the medicinal properties of the plant. Though the etymology is uncertain, it could be derived from Latin gens meaning “tribe, people, kin, family” from Proto-Indo-European *genh- meaning “to produce, to beget, to give birth”. Though Gentian is a male name in Albania with Gentiana being its feminine form, in the English-speaking world Gentian could be used as a unisex name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-Eurpean

Variants:

  • Gentian (Albanian, English)
  • Gentien (French)
  • Gentius (Illyrian, Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Gentienne (French)
  • Gentian (English)

 

Thistle

Thistle is the name of a genus of prickly plants which comes from Old English þistel from Proto-Germanic *þistilaz which seems to come from Proto-Indo-European *steig-,*steyg- meaning “to prick”. Thistle also refers to a color, a pale purplish color like the flower, as well as also being the national emblem of Scotland. It’s also a surname, likely used to refer to someone who lived near an abundance of thistles or used as a nickname for someone who had a prickly personality.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

June

June is the sixth month of the year according to the Julian calendar. The name derives from the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and goddess of marriage and women; Hera is her Greek counterpart. Her name is possibly related to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful” from Proto-Indo-European *yeu- meaning “vital force”, related to her role as a goddess of childbirth.

June may also be related to Latin iuniores meaning “the younger ones”.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Junie
  • Juno
  • Junia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Junius (Ancient Roman)

 

Varun

Varun is an Indian male name, a variant of Varuna, the name of an ancient Hindu god, one of the oldest in Hindu myth, who was the supreme leader of the cosmos, god of the sky, rain, celestial ocean, a well as keeper of the law and the underworld, responsible for the moral laws of the universe. He could see what people would do with his thousand eyes, and give out the appropriate punishment to those who sinned. His name is possibly related to Sanskrit root vr meaning “to envelop, to surround” likely in reference to the fact that Varuna had domain over the world. It may be related to Proto-Indo-European root *wer or *wel meaning “to cover”. Varuna’s importance eventually diminished as Indra and other gods became more important, his dominion limited and restricted to celestial waters instead of the entire world, later becoming more of an underworld deity who kept the souls of those who drowned and could give out immortality.

Origin: Sanskrit, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Varuna (Hindu)
  • Baruna (Malay)

 

Female forms:

  • Varuni

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle