Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Northa

Northa is a feminine form of North, one of the four cardinal points of the compass referring to an area or geography facing towards north. The word comes from Old English norð ultimately deriving from Proto-Indo-European *ner meaning “left, below” in reference to north being to the left of the rising sun. Northa also seems to be a surname although I couldn’t find any information behind it as a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • North (English; unisex)

 

Albion

Albion was once the earliest known name of what is now Great Britain and is sometimes still used as a poetic name for it. It’s related to Latin albus meaning “white”, in reference to the White Cliffs of Dover, though I’ve also seen it related to Common Celtic *albiyo “white; upper world” as opposed to the underworld. It’s also been linked to Proto-Indo-European *alb meaning “mountain”.

Origin: Latin, Celtic, Proto-Indo–European

Variants:

  • Albiona (f)

Vidya

Vidya is an Indian unisex name meaning “knowledge, science, learning”, “correct knowledge”, “clarity”, coming from the same root word as Veda from Sanskrit vetti (to know, to understand) from Proto-Indo-European root word *weyd (to see). It’s also one of the epithets of the Hindu goddess Sarasvati (also spelled Saraswati).

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Widya (Indonesian)

 

Moon

Moon comes from Old English mona from Proto-Germanic *menon- from Proto-Indo-European me(n)ses meaning “month, moon” from *meh “to measure”. Moon is also a Korean surname from Chinese Wen meaning “literature, culture, writing”, as well as being an English surname with several possible origins behind it: it may have originated from Cornish mon “thin”, originally a nickname for a thin or slender person; it also derives from a place name in France, a village called Moyon. It could also have risen from Anglo-Norman moun or mon meaning “monk”, a nickname for someone who lived like a monk, or it could be from an Anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Mocháin “descendant of Mochán”, the latter meaning “early, timely”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Korean, Cornish, Anglo-Norman

Variants:

  • Mun (Korean)

 

Adriano

Adriano is the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of Adrian, the English form of Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Adriano is also a Spanish and Italian surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Adrian (English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian)
  • Adrien (French)
  • Hadrianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadrian (Roman)
  • Adrià (Catalan)
  • Adrijan (Macedonian, Croatian)
  • Jadran (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Jadranko (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adriaan (Dutch)
  • Arjan (Dutch)
  • Adrianus (Dutch)
  • Adorján (Hungarian)
  • Adrián (Hungarian, Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Adriana (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianna (Polish, English)
  • Adriana (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianne (English)
  • Hadriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadria (Roman)
  • Adria (English)
  • Adrijana (Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Jadranka (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adrienne (French)
  • Adrienn (Hungarian)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Lydia

Lydia is a Greek female name derived from the name of an ancient kingdom in Asia Minor, used to refer to someone who came from there. It was apparently named after a king, Lydus or Ludos, whose name might mean “beautiful one” or “noble one”. Another possible meaning is that it means “play” or “sport” though that seems sketchy.

Lydos could also be tentatively linked to Proto-Indo-European h₁lewdʰ meaning “people”.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Lidia (Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English)
  • Lyydia (Finnish)
  • Lidiya (Russian, Bulgarian)
  • Lídia (Catalan, Portuguese, Hungarian)
  • Lidija (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Lýdie (Czech)
  • Lýdia (Slovak, Faroese)
  • Lydie (French)
  • Lyda (English)
  • Lidda (English)
  • Lydian (English)
  • Lydiana (English)
  • Lidiana (English)
  • Ludia (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Lydus (Ancient Greek)
  • Lydos (Ancient Greek)
  • Ludos (Ancient Greek)

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Veda

Veda is an Indian female name meaning “knowledge, understanding”, “true knowledge”, “knowledge of ritual” or “sacred knowledge, sacred lore” deriving from Sanskrit vetti (to know, to understand) whic comes from the root word vid (to know) from Proto-Indo-European root word *weyd (to see).

The Vedas are the oldest sacred texts of Hinduism. There are four Vedas: Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and the Atharvaveda.

Veda also seems to be a Turkish word meaning “farewell, goodbye, parting” from Arabic wada (goodbye, farewell), though I don’t know it it’s ever used as a given name in Turkey.

Origin: Sanskrit, Arabic

 

वेद (Sanskrit)- Veda

వేద (Telugu)- Veda

ವೇದ (Kannada)- Veda