Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning “moist, tender, delicate” or “calling”, as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning “hope”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic

Variants:

  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadja (German, Slovene)
  • Nadiyya (Arabic)
  • Nadiye (Turkish)
  • Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)

 

نديّة (Arabic) “moist, tender, delicate”

نادية (Arabic) “calling”

 

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Dana

Dana is an English unisex name though it has multiple origins and meanings. As an English given name it’s derived from a surname, a variant of Dane, referring to someone who came from Denmark or had Danish descent. It could also be a variant of D’Aunay, a Huguenot French name derived from several place names in France called Aunay, of unknown meaning.

It’s also the feminine form of Daniel, a Hebrew male name meaning “God is my judge”, or a feminine form of Dan “judge”, as well as meaning a nickname for names such as Bogdana, a Slavic female name meaning “given by God”; Yordana, the Bulgarian feminine form of Jordan meaning “descend” or “flow down” though the name could also have been influenced by Jordanes, an Old German name that probably derives from Old Norse jord meaning “earth”; and Gordana, the feminine form of Gordan, a Slavic name meaning dignified”.  Dana is also a Persian unisex name meaning “wise”, “knowing”, “learned”. Spelled dána, it’s an Irish word meaning “bold” and “presumptuous”, as well as also being a modern form of Danu, the name of an Irish mother goddess and also a Hindu primordial goddess of the sea. Though the etymology behind the name is unclear I’ve seen it listed as meaning “swift flowing” though it also means “river” from the Avestan word dānu meaning “river”; the Danube river comes from this etymology.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Slavic, Persian, Irish,

Variants:

  • Dayna (English)

 

Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning “gracious, dear”.

Origin: Slavic

 

Variants:

  • Myla (English)
  • Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian)
  • Miléna (Hungarian)
  • Milica (Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Ludmila (Czech, Russian)
  • Camilla (English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman)
  • Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Milagros (Spanish)

 

Male forms:

  • Milan (Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch)
  • Milen (Bulgarian)
  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miloš (Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Mile (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Miloje (Serbian)

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Dober

Dober comes from a Slavic word meaning “good”; it’s the name of a settlement (also spelled Dobër and Dobre) in northern Albania. Dober is also a surname of English origin (with various spellings of Dauber, Dawber, Daber, and Doberer), an occupational surname for someone who was a plasterer from Middle English daubere via Old French daubier (whitewash, plasterer).

Origin: Slavic, Old French

 

Lana

Lana is an Arabic female name deriving from a root word meaning “soft, tender, gentle”. It’s also a short form of names like Svetlana, a Slavic female name meaning “light” from Slavic svet (light), or Alana, feminine form of Alan, a Celtic name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to meaning either “little rock” or “handsome” though it might also be related to Alaunus, a Gaulish god of healing and prophecy whose name could be related to Proto-Celtic *al(aun) meaning “nourishing” or *alo meaning “feed, raise, nurture” or possibly meaning “shining one”.

Lana is also a Hawaiian name meaning “calm as still waters” or “afloat”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic, Celtic, Hawaiian

 

لانا (Arabic)

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Vadim

Vadim is a Russian male name of unknown meaning. It’s been used as the Russian form of Bademusthe name of a Persian Christian martyr who was killed in Persia and later recognized as a saint. I’ve seen the name as possibly originating from Persian badian meaning “anise, aniseed”. Vadim could also be a short form of Russian Vadimir composed of Slavic elements vaditi (accuse, blame, slander) and miru (peace, world).

Vadim is also a surname which seems to have originated from the given name.

Nicknames: Vadik is the Russiam diminutive of Vadim

Origin: Persian, Slavic

Variants:

  • Vadimir (Russian)

 

Вадим (Russian) Vadim

Mylo

Origin: Germanic, Slavic, Greek

Meaning: Mylo is a variant form of Milo, an Old Germanic form of Miles. Although the etymology behind the name is unclear, it’s been linked to Slavic mil meaning “gracious, dear” and Latin miles meaning “soldier”.

Milo is also the Latininized form of Greek name Milon meaning “yew”.

Variants:

  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miles (English)
  • Myles (English)