Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Alexander

Alexander is the Latinized form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” from Greek elements alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man). In Greek mythology, it was another name for the Trojan prince Paris, famous for abducting Helen, wife of Menelaus, which started the ten year Trojan war. It’s also the name of Alexander the Great, king of Macedon, who created one of the largest empires in the ancient world. Alexander is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Alex, Xander, Lex, Ander, Sandy, Sander

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alexandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Aleksander (Polish, Slovene, Albanian, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Female forms:

  • Alexandra (Ancient Greek, English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Alexandria (English, Ancient Greek)
  • Alexandrina (Portuguese, English)
  • Aleksandra (Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Estonian)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Mitchell

Mitchell comes from a surname derived from the given name Michel, the French form of Michael meaning “who is like God?”, a rhetorical question implying there is no one like God. It could also be derived from Old English michel or mechel/muchel meaning “big”, originally a nickname for a big man. Mitchell has also been used as the Anglicized form of Irish surname Mulvihill which comes from Gaelic Ó Maoil Mhichíl “descendant of the devotee of St. Michael”, as well as also used as an Anglicized form of another surname, Mickschel, a Czech surname.

Nicknames: Mitch

Origin: Hebrew, Old English

Variants:

  • Mitchel (English)

 

Hikaru

Hikaru is a Japanese unisex name meaning “light” with the kanji or “brightness” with the kanji. Because it’s a unisex name, some kanji characters are used specifically for females while others are used for males only. Some kanji characters used for females are: 光佳留 “light + beautiful, good, excellent + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 光流 “light + to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander”; 光海 “light + sea, ocean”; 光留 “light + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 妃夏瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + summer + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃華瑠 “a rulers wife, queen, empress + flower, splendor + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃香瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + fragrance, fragrant + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; while some kanji used for men are: 光琉 “light + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 太陽 “sun”; “clear”; and 流星 “to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander + star”; 弘明 “to spread, enlarge, expand, great + clear, tomorrow, bright”; and many more depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

Yutaka

Yutaka is a Japanese male name meaning “abundant, plentiful, rich” from Japanese 豊, though it has other meanings depending on the kanji used such as: “prosperous, rich” (); “excellent, outstanding, kind, tenderness” (優); “fertile, lush, abundant” ()“warm” (温); “male, excellent + tall, high, flying” (雄高); “tolerant” (); and other meanings depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet