Issachar

Issachar (pr. ee-sah-kahr; Forvo) comes from a Hebrew male name of uncertain etymology possibly meaning “man of hire” or “there is reward” from Hebrew shakhar (hire, wage, reward, recompense).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Yissachar (Hebrew)
  • Yissakhar (Hebrew)

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Finn

Finn comes from an Irish name meaning “fair”, “blessed” or “white” derived from Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finn is the older spelling of Fionn, which belongs to the name of a warrior in Irish myth known as Fionn mac Cumhaill (or Finn MacCool in English) and the leader of the Fianna. His birth name was Deimne but he was later nicknamed Fionn when his hair turned prematurely white.

Finn also comes from Old Norse Finnr meaning “a Finn, a Sami, Lapp”, a given name and byname used to refer to someone who came from Finland or was part of the Sami people (also known as Lapps). Although the origin behind  finnr is uncertain it has been linked to Old Norse meaning “wanderer”. Finnr is the name of a dawrf mentioned in the Völuspá, the first poem in the Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems. Finn is also a surname which could be be derived from both sources, as well as being a short form of names like Finley, Finnegan, or Thorfinn/Torfinn

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Old Norse

Varinats:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finnagán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Fionnán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Finnán (older form of Fionnán)
  • Finnr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Finnur (Icelandic)
  • Fína (Greenlandic)
  • Finna (Greenlandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Fiona (Scottish, English)
  • Finna (female form of Finnr; Old Norse, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian)

 

Phineas, Phineus

Phineas is a male name of uncertain meaning and etymology. It’s been linked to Hebrew meaning “serpent’s mouth” or “oracle”, as well as Ancient Egyptian meaning “the Nubian”. Spelled Phineus, it’s a Greek name borne by several figures in Greek mythology. The most notable bearer is a king of Thrace who features in the Argonautica, a Greek epic poem written about Jason and the Argonauts. This Phineus is either the son of Agenor or Poseidon, god of the sea, who had the gift of foresight and was blinded because he revealed too much of the gods’ plans (though there are different versions of how he became blind). The Argonauts came upon him on an island and agreed to help them on their voyage if they helped him get rid of the Harpies that were constanty harassing him by eating his food everytime he tried to eat. The meaning behind the name is unknown as well, though I’ve seen it listed as possibly meaning “vulture” or it might be composed from Greek elements iphios (strong, stout) and noûs (mind, reason, understanding) so essentially meaning “strong mind” or “strong understanding”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Phinehas (Biblical)
  • Phinees (Biblical Greek)
  • Pinchas (Hebrew)
  • Finees (Biblical Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Phinea

 

Golda, Goldie

Golda is a Yiddish female name meaning “gold”. Goldie could be a nickname for Golda, though it’s also an English name, originally used as a nickname for someone who had blond hair or who was a goldsmith, making it a unisex name. Goldie was also used as a nickname for someone who had an unusual pigmentation of one eye. Both Golda and Goldie are also surnames.

Origin: Yiddish, English

Variants:

  • Goldy (English)
  • Golde (Yiddish)

 

Kelly

Kelly comes from a surname, an anglicized form of Ó Ceallaigh meaning “descendant of Ceallach”, Ceallach being an Irish given name of uncertain meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “bright-headed” or perhaps coming from Irish ceallach “war, strife, contention” or Irish ceall meaning “church”. Kelly could also be derived from Scottish Gaelic coille meaning “wooded area” and “grove, forest, woodland”.

Origin: Gaelic

Female forms:

  • Kelley
  • Kelli
  • Kellie
  • Kelleigh

 

Male forms:

  • Kelley
  • Ceallach (Irish)
  • Ceallagh (Irish)
  • Ceallachán (Irish)

 

Claudia

Claudia is the feminine form of Claudius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “lame, crippled” from Latin claudus. 

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Klaudia (Polish, Slovak)
  • Klavdiya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Klaudija (Croatian)
  • Claudette (French, English)
  • Claudine (French, English)
  • Cláudia (Portuguese)
  • Klavdija (Slovene)
  • Gladys (Welsh, English)
  • Claude (French, English)
  • Claudie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Claudius (Ancient Roman)
  • Claudio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Cláudio (Portuguese)
  • Klaudio (Croatian)
  • Klaudijs (Latvian)
  • Klaudiusz (Polish)
  • Claudiu (Romanian)
  • Claud (English)
  • Claude (French)

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)