Sydelle

Sydelle is an English female name, of modern coinage. I couldn’t quite find a specific origin or meaning to it, though it’s possible that it may have arisen as a variant (or perhaps another nickname) of Sadie, itself originally a diminutive form of Sarah meaning “lady, princess, noblewoman”. It also does resemble Sydney, which comes from an English surname meaning…

Dryope

Dryope is the name of several figures in Greek mythology, including the name of a princess, the daughter of Dryops of Oeta, and who was turned into a black poplar tree. It’s made up from Ancient Greek elements drûs (tree; oak) and ops (eye, face), meaning “tree-faced” or “oak-eyed”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Male forms: Dryops (Ancient Greek)  

Shirin

Shirin is a Persian female name meaning “sweet; pleasant”. One famous Shirin was a Persian queen, the wife of Khosrow II, the last great Sasanian king of Iran. She and Khosrow feature in Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh (meaning Book of Kings, an epic long poem about the mythical history of the Persian empire) as well as an epic poem titled Khosrow…

Forsythia

Forsythia is the name of a genus of flowering plants, named after Scottish botanist William Forsyth, Forsyth being a Scottish surname, an anglicized form of Gaelic Fearsithe meaning “man of peace” or “peaceful man”, made up of Scottish Gaelic elements fear (man; husband) and sìth (peace), the latter also being “fairy”. It’s also possible that Forsyth may have originated as a locational…

Crispin

Crispin is the English form of Roman cognomen Crispinus, a diminutive of Crispus meaning “curly (haired)”. Crispin is also a surname originating from the given name. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Crispus (Ancient Roman) Crispinus (Ancient Roman) Crispian (Archaic English) Kryspin (Polish)  

Carlos

Carlos is the Spanish and Portuguese form of Charles, which comes from Germanic Karl meaning “man” via Proto-Germanic *karilaz (free man) derived from a PIE root word. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”. Carlos is also a…

Baron

Baron is the name of a title in English nobility, which is of low rank. It comes from Late Latin barō meaning “man, servant; baron” via Frankis *barō (servant; man, warrior) which may be derived from PIE root word *bʰer- (to bear, carry). It’s also possible that Baron may be related to Old English beorn (man, warrior) but that’s just a possibility….

Zuri

Zuri comes from a Swahili word meaning “beautiful, good” and is used as a unisex name, though in the U.S. it seems to be more popular for girls. Origin: Swahili  

Celina

Celina seems to be a variant spelling of Selena at first glance, the name of the Greek goddess of the moon, which fittingly means “moon”; though it may also be a short form of Marcelina (or any name ending in celina), the Polish feminine form of Marcellus, an ancient Roman cognomen which originated as a diminutive of Marcus, a Roman praenomen which…

Charis

Charis is the singular form of Charites, also known as the Graces in Roman myth, who are the goddesses of grace, beauty, charm, human creativity, mirth, joy, dance, and song. Though there are traditionally three goddesses presented as the Charites (Aglaia, goddess beauty, glory, and adornment; Euphrosyne, goddess of mirth good cheer, glory, and merriment; and Thalia, goddess of festivity…