Noa

Noa is a Hebrew female name, the strictly feminine form of Noah meaning "motion", as well as also being a Spanish surname derived from the given name. Noa is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used: it's made up with Japanese no (乃), a possessive article combined with a (愛) "affection, love"; … Continue reading Noa

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Eden

Eden is the name of the biblical garden where Adam and Eve came from before being expelled, becoming synonomous with paradise and anyplace that is fertile and utnouched. Although I've seen it listed as meaning "place of paradise" from Hebrew, it could perhaps be derived from an older source, Sumerian edin meaning "steppe" or "plain". … Continue reading Eden

Fingal

Fingal is the anglicized form of Fionnghall, a Scottish Gaelic name meaning "white stranger" from Gaelic elements fionn (white, fair) via Proto-Celtic *windos (white) and gall (stranger) via Old Irish gall (stranger, foreigner) which comes from Latin Gallus meaning "Gaul", referring to someone who came from there though it later came to mean "foreigner" from a Proto-Indo-European source. Nicknames: Fin Origin: Proto-Celtic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Fionnghall … Continue reading Fingal

Denzil

Denzil has several possible meanings but nothing concrete, and they may not even be accurate. It’s from a surname denoting someone who came from a place called Denzell in Cornwall. I’ve seen it listed as meaning “fort”, “fertile highland” or “high stronghold”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a pet form of German name Denz, a short … Continue reading Denzil

Chester

Chester comes from an English surname referring to someone who came from the town of Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum meaning “fort” from PIE *ḱes- (to cut, to cut off). Nicknames: Ches, Chet Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Reed

Reed comes from an English surname which comes from multiple sources: it comes from Old English rēad meaning "red" from Proto-Germanic *raudaz via Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ- (red); it was originally a nickname given to someone with red hair or a ruddy complexion; it's also from Old English ried meaning "clearing", likely a topographical surname for someone who lived in or near one; it comes … Continue reading Reed

Leland

Leland comes from an English surname deriving from a place name in England meaning "fallow land" or "untilled land" from Old English læge (fallow, untilled) and land (land) which comes from Proto-Germanic *landą (land) deriving from Proto-Indo-European *lendh- (2) (land, heath). Leland is also a surname deriving from the given name, though it's also a shortened form of McClellan or McLelland, both an anglicized form of … Continue reading Leland

Melrose

Melrose comes from an English surname derived from a place name in Scotland meaning "barren moor" or "barren heath" from Welsh moel (bare, barren; bald) from Proto-Celtic *maylos; and rhos (moor, heath), though the second element may also be derived from Old Irish ros meaning "promontory". However, Melrose as a given name could also be a combination of Mel, either a short … Continue reading Melrose

Arkady

Arkady is a variant transcription of Arkadiy, the Russian form of Arkadios, an Ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia", originally used to refer to someone who came from the region of Arcadia. The name received its name from Arcas, king of Arcadia and the son of the Greek god Zeus and the nymph Callisto, who was turned into a bear either by an angry Hera or by Zeus in an … Continue reading Arkady