Alesia

Alesia (pr. a-lee-see-yah) was the name of an ancient Gaulish city in which a decisive battle between Julius Caesar against the Gauls determined the victor of the Gallic tribes and Gaul (the Romans won). I’m not sure what the origin or meaning behind the name is. It might be derived from Greek alexis meaning “defender, helper”. In the modern era, Alesia could be a variant spelling of Alicia, a Latinized form of Alice which comes from Old French Aalis which itself comes from Old Germanic name Adalheidis made up from adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type) meaning “noble kind” or “noble type”.

Origin: Greek, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Alicia (Spanish, English)
  • Alecia (English)
  • Alice (English, French, Portuguese, Italian)

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Quincy

Quincy comes from a surname derived from a place name in France called Cuinchy, which comes from the given name Quintus which means “fifth” in Latin, either given to a fifth-born child or someone born in the fifth month.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Quincey (English)
  • Quincie (English)
  • Quintus (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Quinta (Ancient Roman)

 

Hamilton

Hamilton comes from a surname derived from the name of a town that no longer exists in Leicestershire, England. It means “crooked hill” from Old English hamel (crooked, mutilated) and dun (hill).

Origin: Old English

 

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Lyonesse

Lyonesse is the name of a country in Arthurian legend bordering Cornwall, the home of Tristan whose father was its king, as well as also being the site of the final battle between King Arthur and Mordred. It was said to have sunk beneath the waters. It’s also the name of an Arthurian character, Lyonesse, the sister of Lynette, in the story of Gareth and Lynette. Lyonesse does sound like a variant spelling of Lioness, the name of a female lion, though I’ve also seen it listed as being the English form of French of Léoneis or Léonois, the French form of Lodonesia which is the Latin name for Lothian, a region in Scotland. The etymology of Lothian is unknown.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Lyoness
  • Lioness
  • Lionesse

 

Volterra

Volterra is the name of a town in Italy that goes back to the time of the Etruscans (who called it Velathri before the Roman conquered it and renamed it Volterrae, eventually becoming Volterra). The name is of Etruscan origin and the first part of the name, vel, might come from a root verb used to indicate height, such as a hill, and used in the names of families to indicate a high status. As a surname Volterra is used to describe someone who came from the town of Volterra.

Origin: Etruscan

Variants:

  • Velathri (Etruscan)

 

Dober

Dober comes from a Slavic word meaning “good”; it’s the name of a settlement (also spelled Dobër and Dobre) in northern Albania. Dober is also a surname of English origin (with various spellings of Dauber, Dawber, Daber, and Doberer), an occupational surname for someone who was a plasterer from Middle English daubere via Old French daubier (whitewash, plasterer).

Origin: Slavic, Old French