Briseis is the name of a character in the Iliad, who was captured by Greek forces and became Achilles’s slave and concubine. Her real name was Hippodameia though she was known as Briseis because her father’s name was Briseus, a sort of patronymic name giving her as the daughter of Briseus. When Agamemnon was forced to give up his own concubine Chryseis he demanded Briseis from Achilles, which caused Achilles to withdraw…


Endellion is a Cornish female name, the Cornish form of Endelienta which seems to be the Latinized form of a Celtic name of unknown meaning, Cenheidlon or Cynheiddon. It’s been linked to intensifying prefix ande- and Cornish luen “full”. Origin: Celtic Variants: Endelyn (Cornish) Endelient (Cornish) Endelyon (Cornish) Endelienta Endellienta  


Basima is an Arabic female name, the feminine form of Basim meaning “smiling, smile” or “one who smiles”. Origin: Arabic Variants: Basimah (Arabic) Baseema (Arabic) Baseemah (Arabic)   Male forms: Basim (Arabic) Bassim (Arabic) Bassem (Arabic) Baseem (Arabic)     Basimah- باسمة (Arabic)  


Levana is the name of an ancient Roman goddess involved in the rituals of childbirth. The name comes from Latin levare meaning “to lift” which derives from PIE *h₁lengʷʰ- (light (not heavy)). Levana is also a variant transcription of Lebanah, a Hebrew name meaning “white” from Hebrew laban though it is also used as a poetic term for “moon”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Hebrew…


Kiran is an Indian unisex name meaning “dust”, “thread”, or “ray of light” from Sanskrit kirana (ray of light, beam). It could also be a variant spelling of Kieran, the anglicized form of Irish Ciarán, meaning “black, dark” from Irish Ciar with the diminutive suffix -an, so the name essentially means “little dark one”, likely in reference to someone who had dark hair….


Evangeline is a female given name meaning “good news” derived from Latin evangelium derived from Ancient Greek euángelos (bringing good news) composed from eu (good, well) and angelos (messenger), both deriving from a PIE root source. Nicknames: Eva, Evangie, Leen, Lina Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Evangelina (Spanish, English) Evangelia (Greek) Evangeliya (Bulgarian) Evangelija (Macedonian) Vangelija (Macedonian) Évangéline (French)  


Iris is the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow and a messanger of the gods. Her name means “rainbow” in Greek derived from PIE root word *weh₁y- (to twist, wind, weave, plait; to wrap, enclose cover). Iris also refers to a genus of flowers which comes from the Greek word for rainbow, as well as…


Iskra is a Slavic female name meaning “spark”. Origin: Slavic  


Esperanza is a Spanish female name (and word) meaning “hope” derived from Latin sperare (hope) via PIE *speh₁- (to succeed, to prosper, to turn ot well). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Sperantia (Late Roman) Shprintza (Yiddish) Shprintze (Yiddish) Shprintzel (Yiddish diminutive of Esperanza)  


Sappho is an Ancient Greek female name possibly related to Greek sappheiros meaning “sapphire” either derived from a Semitic source or possibly from Sanskrit sanipriya meaning “dark-colored stone” or more literally “dear to Saturn”. The name is famously associated with a 7th century Greek poetess and as a symbol of female homosexuality. Origin: Semitic, Sanskrit    


Habiba is an Arabic female name (and word) meaning “beloved, darling, sweetheart” as well as also meaning “friend”. Origin: Arabic Variants: Habeeba Habibah Male forms: Habib Habeeb   Habiba -حبيبة (Arabic)  


Lavender is the name of a group of light purple flowers in the genus Lavandula. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it could be derived from Latin lividus meaning “bluish; envious” and the spelling was altered to resemble French lavare (to wash, bathe). Lavender is also an English and Dutch surname, originally an occupational name for a washerman or…


Ideal is an English word referring to an idea or concepton of perfection or excellence, a stand for people to strive for; it also refers to something that exists only in the mind. It comes from Late Latin idealis (existing in idea) derived from Ancient Greek idea (form, look, appearance; notion, pattern) from a PIE root word. Origin: Proto-Indo-European  


Ryana is the feminine form of Ryan, an anglicized form of Irish surname Ó Riain meaning “descendant of Rían”, Rían meaning “little king” from Irish rí (king) with the diminutive suffix -an. It could also be a variant spelling of Rhianna, either a variant of Rhiannon meaning “great queen” or it could be a variant spelling of Rihanna which derives from…


Ellen is the English medieval form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it could also possibly be linked to Greek selene meaning “moon”. Ellen is also the Dutch short form of Eleonora, a cognate of Eleanor which is the Old French form of…


Liesel is the German diminutive of Elisabeth, the Dutch and German form of Elizabeth which is the English form of Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Liesl (German) Lisl (Austrian) Liese (German, Dutch) Liesa (German)  


Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting…


Juana is a Spanish female name, the feminine form of Juan which is the Spanish and Manx form of John, the English form of Hebrew Yochanan meaning “Yahweh is gracious”. In Spanish it’s pronounced hwa-na. Nicknames: Juanita (Spanish) Origin: Hebrew Male forms: Juan (Spanish, Manx)  


Gladys comes from an old Welsh name, Gwladus, of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from gwlad meaning “country” which derives from a PIE source. It has also been used as the Welsh form of Claudia meaning “lame, crippled”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Gwladys (Welsh) Gwladus (Welsh)  


Oakley comes from an English surname, from a place name meaning “oak clearing” composed from Old English āc (oak) and lēah (clearing, meadow). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Oakeley (English) Oaklie (English) Oaklee (English)