Melanie

Melanie is the English form of Mélanie, the French form of Latin Melania derived from Ancient Greek melas meaning “black, dark”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Mélanie (French)
  • Melany (English)
  • Mellony (English)
  • Mellanie (English)
  • Melánie (Czech)
  • Melaina (Greek)
  • Melánia (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Melania (Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman)
  • Melanija (Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian, Lithuanian)
  • Melani (Croatian, Slovene, Modern Greek, English)

 

Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Fahima

Fahima is the feminine form of Fahim, an Arabic male name meaning “intelligent, scholar” though it also means “understanding, comprehension”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Faheema (Arabic)
  • Fehime (Turkish)
  • Fahmida (Urdu)

 

Male forms:

  • Fahim (Arabic)
  • Faheem (Arabic)
  • Fehim (Turkish)

 

فهمة (Arabic)

 

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Blaer

Blaer is an Icelandic unisex name meaning “gentle breeze” or “gust of wind”. Although it was used as a masculine name in Iceland, it wasn’t until 2013 that it was officially accepted as a female name as well.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Blær (Icelandic)