Baylor

Baylor comes from an English surname with several possible meanings: either a variant spelling of Bailor, which comes from a legal term meaning "one who delivers goods", referring to someone who transferred property to another person (bailee) for safekeeping, from Old French bailler (to deliver, hand over) ultimately derived from Latin bāiulus (one who bears a burden; porter, carrier); it could … Continue reading Baylor

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Henry

Henry comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, rule). It's also a surname derived form the given name. Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Heimirich (Ancient Germanic) Heinrich (Ancient Germanic, German) Henricus (Dutch, Latinized Ancient Germanic) Henrik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian) Endika (Basque) Enric (Catalan) Jindřich (Czech) Herry (Medieval … Continue reading Henry

Shepherd

Shepherd comes from an English surname, an occupational name for someone who tended over sheep. It comes from Old English sceap (sheep) and hierde (herdsman) or weard (guardian, watchman). A shepherd also refers to someone who protects, watches over, and guides over someone or a community as well as also referring to a member of the clergy. Nicknames: Shep, Herd Origin: … Continue reading Shepherd

Devon

Devon is the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area known as the Dumnonii which is made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning "deep" or "world" and *nanto meaning "stream" or "valley" so the name would mean "deep valley" or "deep stream". It may also be a variant spelling … Continue reading Devon

Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba'al meaning "grace of Ba'al", Ba'al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means "lord, husband". Hannibal … Continue reading Hannibal

Orin

Orin could be a variant of Orrin, itself an anglicized form of Odhrán, an Irish male name meaning "little pale green one", or a variant spelling of Oren, a Hebrew male name meaning "pine tree". It's also a surname originating from the given name. Orin is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji … Continue reading Orin

Piero

Piero is the Italian form of Peter, the English form of Greek Petros meaning "stone, rock". Piero is also an Italian surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Pierino (Italian diminutive) Origin: Greek Variants: Pietro (Italian) Pier (Italian, Dutch) Peter (English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak)   Female forms: Piera (Italian) Pietra (Italian) Pierina (Italian diminutive … Continue reading Piero

Seven

Seven comes from the English word for 7, a number long since considered lucky, such as the idea of a seventh son of a seventh son being lucky. It comes from Proto-Germanic *sebun derived from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥ (seven). Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Lyndon

Lyndon comes from an English surname meaning "lime tree hill" or "flax hill" from Old English elements lind (lime tree) derived from Proto-Germanic *linþaz (flexible, supple, mild), or lin (flax) and dun (hill). It was originally used as a topographical name for someone who lived near lime trees. Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic Variants: Lindon (English) Linden (English)  

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning "provisions, supplies" from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess