Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Romeo

Romeo is the Italian form of Late Latin Romaeus which comes from Greek rhomaios meaning “Roman”, used in reference to a pilgrim traveling to Rome or someone who was a former citizen of Rome. Probably the most famous bearer of this name is Romeo Montague from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. It’s also a surname that originally referred to someone who came from Rome or who had made a pilgramage to Rome.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Romaeus (Late Latin)
  • Romanus (Late Latin)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian)
  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Roma (Russian diminutive of Roman)
  • Romain (French)
  • Román (Spanish, Hungarian)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Romão (Portuguese)
  • Romulus (Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian)
  • Romaine (French)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Issachar

Issachar (pr. ee-sah-kahr; Forvo) comes from a Hebrew male name of uncertain etymology possibly meaning “man of hire” or “there is reward” from Hebrew shakhar (hire, wage, reward, recompense).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Yissachar (Hebrew)
  • Yissakhar (Hebrew)

 

Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)

 

Capricorn

Capricorn comes from Latin Capricornus meaning “horned goat” or “having horns like a goat” from Latin capra (goat) and cornu (horn), the name originally referring to a mythical hybrid of a goat fish, a half-goat, half-fish creature with its top half that of a goat and its lower half of a fish. It’s the name of a both a constellation and the tenth sign of the zodiac for those born from December 22 to January 20. Those born under the Capricorn are supposedly serious and diligent, ambitious, resolute, and steady but also spiritual, intutitive, and passionate.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Capricornus (Latin)

 

Hermes

Hermes is the name of the Greek god of commerce and trade, known as the trickster god and the protector of thieves, travelers, and athletes, as well as a messenger of the gods and the god of boundaries. He guided the souls of the dead to the underworld. The son of Zeus and Maia, one of the Pleiades, the day after his birth when he was just an infant, Hermes stole his half-brother Apollo’s cattle. When Apollo tracked him down, Hermes gave him a lyre he had just invented from the shell of a tortoise as an apology. He is the father of Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, and the great-grandfather of the hero Odysseus. Although the etymology of the name has been linked to Greek herma meaning “cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker” it could also be related to Proto-European *ser “to bind, put together”; or it could be related to an older word of non-European origin.

Hermes is also a surname, either derived from the name of the Greek god or it could be a Germanic matronynic surname from the given name Ermens, a short form of either Ermelendis (derived from Germanic elements ermen “whole, universal” and linde “soft, tender”) or Ermgart (likely a short form of Ermengarde, also a Germanic name from Germanic ermen “whole, universal” and garde “enclosure”). As a French surname, it could have arisen as a topographic name for someone who lived in a deserted spot or a patch of barren land from Greek eremia “desert, desolate, lonely uninhabited” and the local suffix –ès.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-European, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hermès (French)
  • Ermes (Italian)
  • Ermete (Italian)
  • Ermis (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Hermione (Ancient Greek)
  • Hermia (English)

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)