Blaer

Blaer is an Icelandic unisex name meaning “gentle breeze” or “gust of wind”. Although it was used as a masculine name in Iceland, it wasn’t until 2013 that it was officially accepted as a female name as well.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Blær (Icelandic)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Ellison

Ellison comes from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Ellis”, Ellis being a medieval form of Elijah, a Hebrew male name meaning “my God is Yahweh”. Ellison may also be a variant form of Elisedd, a Welsh male given name meaning “kind, benevolent” from Welsh elus. Ellison seems to be very popular as a girl’s name.

Origin: Hebrew, Welsh

Variants:

  • Ellis (English)
  • Elisedd (Welsh)

 

Ara

Ara is the Latin word for “altar” as well as the name of a constellation in the southern hemisphere. According to Greek mythology, it received its name when the Greek gods overthrew the Titans and the smoke from the altar was what the Milky Way represented. Other possible meanings in Latin are “refuge” and “protection, sanctuary” while in Greek ara means “prayer”, “vow”, and “curse”. Ara is also the singular form of Arai (also spelled Arae), female spirits (or daimones) of curses summoned from the underworld by the dead on those responsible for their deaths. They’re often confused with the Furies (Erinyes) and seem to be the children of Nyx, goddess of the night.

Ara is also the name of a legendary Armenian prince also known as Ara the Handsome because he was so beautiful that even the legendary queen Semiramis (known as Shamiram in Armenian) waged a war to capture him but he ended up being killed in battle. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Ara could also be a variant spelling of Arah, a Hebrew male name meaning “wayfarer, wanderer”. It could also be a nickname for names that being with Ara such as Arabella, Araceli, Ariadne and Arianna, etc. It’s also a place name in several places, as well as also being a Korean female name meaning “to know, to be wise” (아라).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Armenian, Hebrew, Korean

Variants:

  • Arah (Hebrew)
  • Arra (English)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Nika

Nika is a unisex given name with several possible meanings. It’s a Russian short form of Veronika which ultimately comes from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringer of victory, bringing victory”, or any name ending in -nika, as well as also being a short form of Nikita, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning “winner, victor”. Nika is also the feminine form of male given name Nikola, the Slavic form of Nicholas “victory of the people”, as well as also being the (male) dimininutive of Nikoloz, the Georgian form of Nicholas.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nica (Spanish, Swedish)

 

Lennox

Lennox comes from a surname via a place name in Scotland meaning “place of the elms” or “elm field” from Gaelic Leamhnachd made up of Gaelic elements leamhan (elm) and the locational suffix ach (field), likely referring to a place near elm trees. It was first anglicized as Leuenaichs and later as Levanaux and Levenex before finally becomming Lennox.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lenox (English)
  • Lenix (English)
  • Lennix (English)