Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Latham

Latham comes from an English surname meaning “(place of or by) the barns” derived from Old Norse hlatha (barn). It was a habitational place name referring to someone who originally came from a town called Latham.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Laytham (English)
  • Lathom (English)

 

Kato

Kato is an African male name meaning “second of twins” in Luganda, as well as also being a Japanese surname (also spelled Katō or Katou) meaning “increase wisteria” (加藤) though it could have other meanings if other kanji are used. It’s pronounced ka-toe in Japanese. Kato could also be a variant spelling of Cato, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin. Cato is also a Dutch diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of Katherine. Katherine comes from Greek name Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: East African (Luganda), Japanese, Latin, Greek, Coptic

Variants:

  • Kató (Icelandic, Hungarian)
  • Cato (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)

 

Jared

Jared is the English form of Hebrew name Yared or Yered meaning “descent”, so named because in his time angels descended from Heaven down to earth. Jared could also be related to a root word meaning “to rule, command” and I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “rose”, although I don’t know how accurate that last part is. Jared is also a surname though it doesn’t come from Hebrew but from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Gerard”, Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy);

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Jarod (English)
  • Jarrod (English)
  • Jarred (English)
  • Jerrod (English)
  • Jerred (English)
  • Jered (English)
  • Iared (Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin)
  • Yared (Hebrew, Ethiopian)
  • Yered (Hebrew)

 

Ion

Ion is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Creusa (an Athenian princess) and either the god Apollo or the Peloponnesus king Xuthus depending on some versions, and who is the ancestor of the Ionian people. The meaning behind the name is unknown, though it might be a stretch to relate it to Greek ion which means “violet”. I’ve also seen it listed as being the feminine form of Io, borne by numerous figures in Greek myth. Though the etymology behind the name is also unknown, it’s has also been linked to ion (violet).

Ion is the Basque and Romanian form of John, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh is gracious”, as well as being a word, used to refer to an electrically charged atom or a group of atoms formed by the loss or gain of one or more electrons. It comes from Greek ión, the neuter present particle of ienai meaning “to go”, named because the ions move toward the electrode of the opposite charge; -ion is also a suffix indicating something in action from Latin ionem. Ion is also a surname derived from the Romanian given name

Origin: Greek, Hebrew, Latin

Variants:

  • Ioan (Romanian, Bulgarian, Welsh)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle