Trip

Trip comes from a word referring to a journey or a voyage, or it refers to someone who stumbles and falls. It comes from Old French tripper (strike with the feet, tread or skip lightly) which comes from a Germanic source; or it could be from Middle Dutch trippen meaning “to skip, hop, trot, stamp, trample”. Tri- is also a Latin root word meaning “three”, used in conjection with other words such as triple and trisect, so Trip could be used with that in mind, or it could also be used as  nickname for someone who is the third (III) generation of the same name.

Origin: Old French Middle Dutch, Latin

Variants:

  • Tripp (English)

 

Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Ion

Ion is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Creusa (an Athenian princess) and either the god Apollo or the Peloponnesus king Xuthus depending on some versions, and who is the ancestor of the Ionian people. The meaning behind the name is unknown, though it might be a stretch to relate it to Greek ion which means “violet”. I’ve also seen it listed as being the feminine form of Io, borne by numerous figures in Greek myth. Though the etymology behind the name is also unknown, it’s has also been linked to ion (violet).

Ion is the Basque and Romanian form of John, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh is gracious”, as well as being a word, used to refer to an electrically charged atom or a group of atoms formed by the loss or gain of one or more electrons. It comes from Greek ión, the neuter present particle of ienai meaning “to go”, named because the ions move toward the electrode of the opposite charge; -ion is also a suffix indicating something in action from Latin ionem. Ion is also a surname derived from the Romanian given name

Origin: Greek, Hebrew, Latin

Variants:

  • Ioan (Romanian, Bulgarian, Welsh)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Socorro

Socorro is a Spanish and Portuguese female given name (as well as a Spanish word) meaning “help, relief, succor”. It’s taken from a title of the Virgin Mary (Virgen del Perpetuo Socorro, or Our Lady of Pepertual Succor). It derives from Latin succurrere (to bring aid, run to the rescue). It’s also a place name as well as a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Latin

 

 

Quintessa

Quintessa seems to be a variant form of Quintessence, originating from Latin quintus (five, fifth) and essentia (being, essence) meaning “fifth essence” or “fifth being”. In medieval philosophy, quintessence was used to refer to the fifth element after air, water, earth, and fire, also known as aether in Greek. It’s also used as a word to refer to something that is the perfect embodiment of something.

Nicknames: Quin/Quinn, Tess, Tessa

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Quintessence (English)

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Malika

Malika is an Arabic female name meaning “queen”, the feminine form of Malik (king).

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Maleeka (English)
  • Melike (Turkish)

 

Male forms:

  • Malik (Arabic)
  • Malek (Arabic)
  • Melik (Turkish)

 

مالك (Arabic) Malik

 

Risa

Risa is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, made of Japanese elements ri meaning: 梨 “pear”, 里 “village, hometown”, 理 “reason, logic”, “jasmine”; and sa meaning: 紗 “gauze”, 沙 “sand”,  “assistant, help”; and likely other meanings. It could also be a short form of names like Parisa, a Persian name meaning “fairy, like a fairy” or Marisa, a combination of given names Maria (the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”) and Luisa (the feminine form of Luis, the Spanish form of Louis ultimately derived from a Germanic name meaning “famous war/battle”

Risa is also the Spanish word for “laughter, laugh” which comes from Latin risus/rideo. 

Origin: Japanese, Persian, Hebrew, Germanic, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Marisa
  • Parisa