Scotia

Scotia (pr. skoh-sha) was originally the Roman name for Ireland, derived from Scoti or Scotti, a term used to refer to the Gaels, though it later came to refer to Scotland. The origin of the word Scoti/Scotti is unknown. It could possibly be derived from the name of a Celtic tribe of unknown meaning though that seems unlikely since there is no known tribe of that name. Another possible source according to Irish chronicles and myths is that the name is derived from Scota, the name of a princess who was the daughter of an Egyptian pharoah and whose name was given to the country although I can’t say how accurate that last part is, although the stories behind it are fascinating. Nova Scotia (New Scotland) is the name of a province in Canada.

Scotia is also a word used in architecture referring to a concave molding between two fillets, a type of decorative molding. The word comes from Ancient Greek skotía meaning “dark, darkness, shadowy, gloom”.

Origin: Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Scota

 

Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Libelle

Libelle is the German and Dutch word for “dragonfly” as well as the French word (spelled libellé) meaning “wording”; it was used to refer to a type of political pamphlet or book in which it attacked important figures using slander, whether they were real or not, which is where the English word libel comes form. Libelle derive from Latin libellus, a diminutive of liber (book) so essentially meaning “little book”.

Origin: German, Dutch, Latin

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Zakia

Zakia is an Arabic female name with two possible meanings depending on the spelling used, such as زكية meaning “pure” or ذكيه ‎ meaning “intelligent”.

Origin: Arabic

 

Variants:

  • Zakiya
  • Zakiyya
  • Zakiah
  • Zakieh
  • Zakiyah
  • Zakiyyah

 

Male forms:

  • Zaki

 

 

زكية (pure)

ذكيه ‎ (intelligent)

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning “Lord, have mercy”, the vocative form of Kyrios meaning “lord” or “master”. It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning “peel”, “skin” or “bark, rind” referring to the “bark of a tree” as well as an Indonesian and Malay word meaning “left”. Kiri is also a Maltese word meaning “hire” or “rental”, an Estonian word meaning “writing”, “letter”, “script”, as well as a Japanese female name meaning “pear tree” (樹梨) or “fog, mist” () though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s also the word for the paulownia tree (桐). Kyri is also a surname, likely derived from the Greek meaning of the name.

Origin: Greek, Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Kyrie (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Kiri (Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonia, Japanese, English)
  • Kyria (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Kyrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Kyriakos (Ancient Greek)

 

Lucky

Lucky is an English word referring to something or someone having or is marked by good luck or someone or something that is fortunate, and often used as a nickname for someone who is lucky though it could also be used as a given name. Lucky is also a surname derived from the given name Luke/Lucas, the English form of Greek Loukas meaning “from Lucania”, the name of a region in southern Italy. Though the name is of uncertain meaning, Lucania could be related to Greek leukos “white”, “light, bright, shining”, a cognate of Latin lux “light”. It could also be derived from the Latin word lucus (a cognate of lucere “shining, bright”) meaning “sacred wood” or Greek lykos meaning “wolf”.

Origin: Greek, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Luck

 

Hadiyyah

Hadiyyah is an Arabic female name with two possible meanings. It means “gift” as well as also being a variant spelling of Hadia, the feminine form of Hadi meaning “leader, guide”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Hadiyah
  • Hediiye (Turkish)
  • Hadia
  • Hadiya
  • Hadya
  • Hadiiye (Turkish)

 

Male forms:

  • Hadi

 

هدية (Arabic) “gift”

هادية (Arabic) “leader, guide”

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina