Amin

Amin is an Arabic male name meaning “truthful, honest, fair, trustworthy, upright”, as well as also being a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Ameen (Arabic)
  • Emin (Turkish)

 

Female forms:

  • Amina (Arabic, Bosnian)
  • Aminah (Arabic)
  • Emine (Turkish)
  • Emina (Bosnian)

 

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Alan

Alan is a male name of uncertain etymology which may possibly mean “little rock” or “noble” from Old Irish ail. It also means “beautiful, handsome” from Scottish Gaelic àlainn (beautiful, fine, splendid). Alan may also be derived from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, which may be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti meaning “to nourish, grow” from Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂el- (to grow, nourish). Alan is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Al

Origin: Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Allan (English, Scottish, Danish)
  • Allen (English, Scottish)
  • Allyn (English)
  • Alain (French)
  • Alen (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Ailín (Irish)
  • Alun (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Alana (English)
  • Alanna (English)
  • Alannah (English, Irish)
  • Allana (English)
  • Alaina (English)
  • Alayna (English)
  • Alanis (English)
  • Alannis (English)

 

Aries

Aries is the name of a constellation as well as being the first sign of the zodiac. In Greek mythology it represented the golden ram who was sent by the cloud nymph Nephele to rescue her children, Phrixus and Helle, from being sacrificed due to the machinations of their evil stepmother, Ino. As the ram was flying over a narrow strait, Helle fell and drowned in the water (later called Hellespont after her) but her brother Phrixus made it all the way to Colchis, where he was taken in by King Aeetes and married his daughter Chalciope (the sister of Medea). To show his gratitude, Phrixus sacrificed the golden ram and gave its golden fleece to Aeetes, which would later feature in the story of Jason and the Argonauts. The name means “ram” in Latin, in reference to the animal, but it also means “battering ram” which comes from Latin arietare meaning “ram; battering ram” derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “goat, sheep” or “spring, jump”.

Aries is also a surname that derives from a different etymology. It could be a variant of Airey, a place name derived from Old Norse eyrara meaning “gravel-bank stream”, referring to someone who lived by a gravel bank. It may also have been a variant spelling of Arras, denoting someone who came from the city of Arras in France.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Arian
  • Arietis

 

Arthur

Arthur is the name of the legendary king of the Arthurian legends, the king of the Britons who defended against Saxon invaders. The meaning behind the name is unknown though it has often been linked to Celtic *artos meaning “bear” combined with rīxs meaning “king” meaning “bear king” or gwr (man) meaning “bear man”. The name may also be related to Artorius, a rare Roman family name of unknown etymology and meaning. Arthur is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Celtic

Variants:

  • Arturo (Italian, Spanish)
  • Artur (Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Polish, Russian, German, Estonian, Swedish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Artturi (Finnish)
  • Artúr (Hungarian)
  • Artūrs (Latvian)
  • Artūras (Lithunanian)
  • Artair (Scottish)

 

Female forms:

  • Arthuria (English)
  • Arthurina (English)
  • Arthurine (English, French)

 

Albany

Albany is the name of several cities and towns as well as once being an archaic name for a part of Scotland lying north of the River Forth (also known as Albania), derived from Gaelic Alba (which was the Scottish-Gaelic name for Scotland). The name may be derived from Latin albus meaning “white” from Proto-Indo-European *albos (white). Albany is also a surname.

Nicknames: Alb, Albie

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Albania (Latin)
  • Alban (Latin)
  • Alba (Latin)
  • Albion (Latin)
  • Albus (Latin)
  • Albaney (English)
  • Albanie (English)
  • Albanee (English)

August

August is the German, Polish, Catalan, and Scandinavian form of Augustus, originally an Ancient Roman title used by Roman emperors after the first and, by some accounts, greatest emperor of Rome, Gaius Octavius, who was the adopted son and heir of Julius Caesar. It means “majestic”, “venerable”, “great” from Latin augere (to increase). August is also the name of the eighth month of the year. August is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Gus, Auggie

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Augustus (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)
  • Augustinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Aukusti (Finnish)
  • Auguste (French)
  • Augustin (French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German)
  • Augusto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Augusts (Latvian)
  • Augustas (Lithuanian)
  • Augustinas (Lithuanian)
  • Avgust (Russian, Ukrainian, Slovene)
  • Augustine (English)
  • Augustín (Slovak, Czech)
  • Agustí (Catalan)
  • Ágoston (Hungarian)
  • Augustijn (Dutch)
  • Austin (English)
  • Austen (English)
  • Austyn (English)
  • Agostino (Italian)
  • Augustyn (Polish)
  • Agostinho (Portuguese)
  • Avguštin (Slovene)
  • Agustín (Spanish)
  • Awstin (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Augusta (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English, German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish)
  • Auguste (German)
  • Avgusta (Slovene)
  • Augustine (French, German)
  • Augustina (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Agostina (Italian)
  • Augustyna (Polish)
  • Agustina (Spanish)

 

America

America is a unisex given name usually given in honor of the United States of America. It comes from Italian male name Amerigo, the medieval Italian form of Emmerich, a Germanic male name. While the second element of the name comes from ric (power, rule), the first part of the name is a little more complicated. It could be from Germanic ermen (whole, universal), amal (work, labor), or heim (home). Apparently the name came from Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Amerika (English, German, Dutch)
  • América (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

 

Male forms:

  • Americus (Latin)
  • Amerigo (Italian)
  • Emmerich (Germanic)

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Artemis

Artemis is the Greek goddess of the hunt, wild animals, childbirth, and fertility, as well as a protecteress of young girls. A huntress who is often depicted with a bow and arrow, Artemis is the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. Some versions of the myth say Artemis was born first and helped her mother give birth to Apollo, and Artemis herself remained a virgin, forsaking any relationships with men. She’s also been associated with the moon (and Apollo with the sun). As for her name, Artemis is of uncertain etymology and meaning with some sources citing it as pre-Greek. It could possibly be related to Persian *arte or *arta meaning “great, excellent, holy” or from Greek árktos meaning “bear” since she did have a link to bears. The name has also been associated with Greek artemes “safe”, artamos “butcher”, artios “perfect, complete”.

Although Artemis is the name of a Greek goddess, it’s also had some usage as a boy’s name, making it unisex.

Origin: Persian, Greek

Feminine forms:

  • Artemisia (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Artemisa (Romanian)

 

Male forms:

  • Artemas
  • Artemus
  • Artemisios (Ancient Greek)
  • Artemidorus (Ancient Greek)
  • Artemidoros (Ancient Greek)