Cornelian

Cornelian is an alternate spelling of Carnelian, the name of a reddish-brown type of chalcedony used in jewelry. Cornelian comes from either Latin cornus meaning "cornel, dogwood" which may be related to Ancient Greek kerasós (cherry), derived from an uncertain origin, either Anatolian or pre-Greek; or from Latin cornu meaning "horn". The Carnelian spelling seems to have been influenced from Latin carneus …

Adonis

Adonis is the name of a young man in Greek mythology, the lover of Aphrodite. His mother was Myrrha, the princess of Cyprus, who had an unnatural lust for her father, Cinyras; it was a curse given to her by Aphrodite when Myrrha's mother bragged that her daughter was more beautiful than the goddess herself. Myrrha managed to trick her father into having …

Xanthe

Xanthe is the name of several minor figures in Greek mythology. It means "yellow" or "blonde-haired" derived from Greek xanthos (yellow), given to someone who had blonde hair but could also be applied to horses of bay or chestnut coloring. The origin of the word is unknown. Origin: unknown Variants: Xanthi (Modern Greek) Xantho (Ancient Greek) Xanthia …

Pollux

Pollux is the twin brother of Castor in Greek mythology, one of the Dioscuri, regarded as the protectors of sailors and associated with St. Elmo's fire, worshipped by both the Ancient Greek and the Romans. Pollux and Castor are the sons of the Spartan Queen Leda; Pollux is the son of her husband, Tyndareus, while Castor is the son of Zeus. When Castor and Polluxwere dying, Zeus offered Pollux immortality …

Metis

Metis is the name of a Titaness in Greek mythology, the personification of good counsel, prudence, cunning, and wisdom. She was the one who made a potion to force Cronus to throw up the children he had swallowed, helped Zeus during the war of the Olympian gods against the Titans, and was his first wife. However, a …

Castor

Castor is the name of one of the Dioscuri (meaning "the boys of Zeus"), the twin brother of Pollux in Greek mythology.Their mother was Leda, the queen of Sparta and the wife of Tyndareus, but Castor and Pollux had different fathers- Castor was the son of Tyndareus while Pollux was the son of Zeus. Castor was skillful in managing and taming wild horse while Pollux was …

Apollon

Apollon is a Greek and French variant of Apollo, the name of the Greek god of prophecy, medicine, the sun, light, music, poetry, plague and disease, and one of the most important gods in both the Greek and Roman pantheon; and the twin brother of Artemis, the children of Leto and Zeus. Apollon is also a French surname. The origin …

Hecuba

Hecuba is the name of the queen of Troy, the wife of Priam and the mother of 19 of his children, including Hector, Paris, and Cassandra. After the fall of Troy, Hecuba was enslaved along with many of the other women. Hecuba is the Latinized form of Ancient Greek Hekabe, a name of unknown etymology and meaning. However, some sources site her origin as …

Priam

Priam is the name of the king of Troy in Greek mythology who had many children including his sons Hector and Paris and daughter Cassandra; apparently he had as many as fifty sons and daughters with his wife, Hecuba, and his many concubines. When Troy fell, Priam was killed by Achilles's son Neoptolemus. Priam may be derived from Luwian meaning "exceptionally courageous", Luwian being an …

Anthea

Anthea is an Ancient Greek female, the Latinized spelling of Antheia meaning "blossom, bloom" from anthos (bloom, blossom) via a PIE root word. Anthea was also used as an epithet of the goddesses Hera and Aphrodite, as well as the name of one of the Graces (Charites). Antheia is also the name of several places in Greece and Bulgaria. Nicknames: Anthy, …

Leviticus

Leviticus is the name of the third book of the Torah and in the Old Testament. It comes from Latin Liber Leviticus meaning "book of the Levites", so Leviticus means "of the Levites" (the Levites being a priestly class), referring to those who belonged to the tribe of Levi, its founder and the third son of Leah and Jacob. Levi could possibly mean …

Thalia

Thalia is the name of several figures in Greek mythology, including one of the nine Muses who presided over comedy and idyllic poetry, and the name of one of the three Graces. It's the Latinized form of Ancient Greek Thaleia meaning "to flourish, bloom, to be verdant" via thallo (to bloom, sprout; to grow, flourish, thrive). Thalia …