Octavia

Octavia is the feminine form of Octavius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “eighth” from Latin octavus.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Ottavia (Italian)
  • Octávia (Portuguese)
  • Otávia (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Octavie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Octavio (Spanish)
  • Octavius (Ancient Roman)
  • Ottavio (Italian)
  • Octávio (Portuguese)
  • Otávio (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Octave (French)

 

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Letitia

Letitia is a variant form of Laetitia which comes from Latin laetus meaning “joy, happiness, glad”. In Roman mythology, Laetitia is the goddess of happiness and gaiety.

Nicknames: Letty/Lettie, Tisha

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Laetitia (Ancient Roman, English, French)
  • Lettice (English)
  • Letizia (Italian)
  • Leticia (Spanish)
  • Letícia (Portuguese, Hungarian)
  • Latisha (African-American, English)
  • Lateesha

 

Septima

Septima is an Ancient Roman female, name, the feminine form of Septimus, which means “seventh” in Latin, originally used to refer to the seventh-born child or one born in the seventh month. It comes from Latin septem from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥ (seven).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Variants:

  • Septimia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Septimius (Ancient Roman)
  • Settimio (Italian)
  • Septimiu (Romanian)
  • Séptimo (Spanish)

 

Anna-Maria

Anna-Maria is a female given name, a combination of Anna and Maria:

  • Anna is the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • Maria comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr“love”. Maria is also the feminine form of Marius, a Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it’s possible that Mars was derived from an older source, perhaps from from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture) of unknown meaning. Mars could also be the contracted form of an older name, Mavors (or Mavort) which could come from Latin verb mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn), essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same  Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Annamaria (Italian, English)
  • Annamária (Hungarian)
  • Annemarie (Dutch, German)
  • Annmarie (English)

 

Valerian

Valerian comes from Roman cognomen Valerianus which comes from Latin valeo meaning “to be healthy, strong”, derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). Valerian is also the name of a flower and an herb, as well as a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Valerius (Ancient Roman)
  • Valerianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Valérian (French)
  • Valère (French)
  • Walerian (Polish)
  • Walery (Polish)
  • Valeri (Bulgarian, Georgian, Russian)
  • Valeriy (Russian)
  • Valero (Spanish)
  • Valerio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Valério (Portuguese)
  • Valērijs (Latvian)
  • Valeriu (Romanian)
  • Valeriano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Valeriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Valériane (French)
  • Valeria (Ancient Roman, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German)
  • Valerie (English, German, Czech)
  • Valérie (French, Czech)
  • Valera
  • Valeriane

 

Rufus

Rufus comes from an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “red, ruddy, red-haired”, originally a nickname for someone who had red hair. It comes from Latin rufus derived from the Proto-Indo-European root word *h₁rewdʰ- (red). Rufus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European.

Variants:

  • Rufinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufino (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rufius (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufio (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Rufina (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Russian)
  • Rufia (English)

 

Luce

Luce (pr. loo-che in Italian; loos/ luys in French) is the Italian and French form of Lucia, itself the feminine form of Lucius meaning “light” from Latin lux from the Proto-Indo-European word *lewk- (white; light; bright). It was an Ancient Roman given name that was very popular during its time. Luce is also the Italian word for light. Although generally a female name it has had usage as a male name as well. Luce is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Variants:

  • Lucia (Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucie (French, Czech, English)
  • Lucette (French diminutive of Luce)
  • Lucetta (English)
  • Lucilla (Italian, Ancient Roman diminutive of Lucia)
  • Lucila (Spanish)
  • Llúcia (Catalan)
  • Luca (Hungarian, Croatian)
  • Lucija (Slovene, Croatian)
  • Luus (Limburgish, Dutch)
  • Lucinda (English, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Lucile (French, English)
  • Lucille (French, English)
  • Luzia (German, Portuguese)
  • Lūcija (Latvian)
  • Liucija (Lithuanian)
  • Łucja (Polish)
  • Lucja (Polish)
  • Lúcia (Portuguese)
  • Liùsaidh (Scottish)
  • Lucía (Spanish)
  • Lleucu (Welsh)

 

Male forms:

  • Lucio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Lucius (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Loukios (Ancient Roman)
  • Lucjusz (Polish)
  • Lúcio (Portuguese)

 

Claudia

Claudia is the feminine form of Claudius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “lame, crippled” from Latin claudus. 

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Klaudia (Polish, Slovak)
  • Klavdiya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Klaudija (Croatian)
  • Claudette (French, English)
  • Claudine (French, English)
  • Cláudia (Portuguese)
  • Klavdija (Slovene)
  • Gladys (Welsh, English)
  • Claude (French, English)
  • Claudie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Claudius (Ancient Roman)
  • Claudio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Cláudio (Portuguese)
  • Klaudio (Croatian)
  • Klaudijs (Latvian)
  • Klaudiusz (Polish)
  • Claudiu (Romanian)
  • Claud (English)
  • Claude (French)

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)