Aquila

Aquila comes from an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" from Latin aquila derived from aquilus (black, dark-colored). It's the name of a constellation, the name of a genus of eagles, as well as a surname derived from the given name. Although Aquila was traditionally a masculine name in Ancient Roman (with Aquilina being its feminine form), it has been … Continue reading Aquila

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Hilary

Hilary is the English form of Hilarius and Hilaria, both an Ancient Roman name meaning "happy, cheerful" from Latin hilaris via Ancient Greek hilarós from hílaos (gracious, merciful; kind, mild, gentle) deriving from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Hilary was once a very popular male name before becoming more common for women in the 20th century. Hilary is also a surname originating from the given name. … Continue reading Hilary

Maraya

Maraya is a variant spelling of Mariah, itself a variant form of Maria which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, … Continue reading Maraya

Lukius

Lukius is a variant of Loukios, an Ancient Roman given name meaning "light" from Latin lux. The name derives from Proto-Italic *louks (light) from Proto-Indo-European root word *lewk- (white; light; bright; to shine). Also spelled Lucius though the Ancient Romans pronounced the c like a k. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Lucius (Ancient Roman, English) Loukios (Ancient Roman) Lucio (Italian) Lucjusz (Polish) Lúcio (Portuguese) Lucio (Spanish)   Female … Continue reading Lukius

Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "heaven, sky" from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived … Continue reading Celia

Alba

Alba is a female given name which has a few different meanings and etymologies: it's a feminine form of Albus, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright". The name may be derived from Latin albus meaning “white, bright, clear” from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white); Alba may also be derived from Germanic element alb meaning "elf" from Proto-Germanic *albiz (elf, fairy) which ultimately derives from the same … Continue reading Alba

Vincent

Vincent is the English form of Vincentius, an Ancient Roman name meaning "conquering" from Latin vincere (to conquer) derived from Proto-Indo-European *weyk-(3) (to fight, conquer; to overcome). Vincent is also a surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Vince, Vin, Vinny/Vinnie Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Vincentius (Ancient Roman) Vincente (Italian) Vincenzo (Italian) Bikendi (Basque) Vicenç (Catalan) Vicent (Catalan) Vinko (Croatian, Slovene) … Continue reading Vincent

Cassian

Cassian is a shortened form of Roman family name Cassianus, a derivative of Cassius, another Roman family name of uncertain meaning though it may be related to Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain" derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱes- (to cut). The name is either pronounced kash-an or kass-ee-an. Cassian is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Cash, Cass Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kassian (English) … Continue reading Cassian

Calpurnia

Calpurnia is an Ancient Roman name, the feminine form of Calpurnius meaning "chalice, cup". It comes from Latin calpar, used to refer to a vessel for liquids such as wine, which derives from Ancient Greek kalpís (jug, urn). Calpurnia was the third wife of Julius Caesar who apparently had a premonition of her husband's death and features in Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar … Continue reading Calpurnia