Claudia

Claudia is the feminine form of Claudius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “lame, crippled” from Latin claudus. 

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Klaudia (Polish, Slovak)
  • Klavdiya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Klaudija (Croatian)
  • Claudette (French, English)
  • Claudine (French, English)
  • Cláudia (Portuguese)
  • Klavdija (Slovene)
  • Gladys (Welsh, English)
  • Claude (French, English)
  • Claudie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Claudius (Ancient Roman)
  • Claudio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Cláudio (Portuguese)
  • Klaudio (Croatian)
  • Klaudijs (Latvian)
  • Klaudiusz (Polish)
  • Claudiu (Romanian)
  • Claud (English)
  • Claude (French)

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)

 

Kato

Kato is an African male name meaning “second of twins” in Luganda, as well as also being a Japanese surname (also spelled Katō or Katou) meaning “increase wisteria” (加藤) though it could have other meanings if other kanji are used. It’s pronounced ka-toe in Japanese. Kato could also be a variant spelling of Cato, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin. Cato is also a Dutch diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of Katherine. Katherine comes from Greek name Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: East African (Luganda), Japanese, Latin, Greek, Coptic

Variants:

  • Kató (Icelandic, Hungarian)
  • Cato (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Cassia

Cassia is the female form of Cassius, an Ancient Roman family name possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning “empty, vain”. It also means “cinnamon” in Latin and Greek, deriving from Hebrew qetzi’ah (cassia, cinnamon) (where the names Keziah comes from) from root word qatsa meaning “to cut off, strip off bark”. The name is pronounced either kash-uh or kas-ee-uh.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Kassia (English, Greek)
  • Keziah
  • Kezia
  • Kassiani (Greek)
  • Cássia (Portuguese)

 

Male forms:

  • Cassius (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Kassius (English)

 

Maximus

Maximus is an Ancient Roman family name meaning “greatest” from Latin maximus. 

Nicknames: Max

Origin: Ancient Roman

Variants:

  • Maximos (Latin Greek)
  • Maksim (Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Macedonian)
  • Maxim (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian)
  • Maxime (French)
  • Massimo (Italian)
  • Maksym (Polish, Ukrainian)
  • Máximo (Spanish)
  • Macsen (Welsh)
  • Maxen (Welsh)
  • Maximilian (Ancient Roman)
  • Maximillian (English)
  • Maximilianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Maximillus
  • Maximilien (French)
  • Massimiliano (Italian)
  • Maximiliano (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Maksimilian (Russian)
  • Maksymilian (Polish)
  • Maxmilián (Czech)
  • Maximilián (Slovak)

 

Female forms:

  • Maxima (Ancient Roman)
  • Maximiliana (Ancient Roman)
  • Máxima (Spanish)
  • Massima (Italian)
  • Maximiliane (German)
  • Maximilienne (French)
  • Maxine (English)
  • Maxene (English)

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Titus

Titus comes from an Ancient Roman given name of unknown meaning though it has been linked to Latin titulus meaning “title of honor” or Latin titio “fire-brand”. It’s likely, however, that the name is pre-Roman in origin, possibly Sabine, and its true meaning lost to time. Titus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Sabine

Variants:

  • Tito (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Tiitus (Estonian, Finnish)
  • Titos (Biblical Greek)
  • Titas (Lithuanian)
  • Tytus (Polish)
  • Tit (Russian)
  • Titius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Titia (Ancient Roman, Dutch, German)
  • Tita (Ancient Roman)

 

Quinton

Quinton has two possible origins and meanings. The first is that it’s a variant spelling of Quentin, which is the French form of Roman name Quintinus derived from Quintus meaning “fifth” in Latin, used for a fifth child or a child born in the fifth month of the year.

Quinton is also an English surname meaning “Queen’s town” from Old English elements cwen (queen, woman) and tun (enclosure, settlement, town).

Origin: Latin, Old English

Variants:

  • Quentin (French, English)
  • Quinten (English, Dutch)
  • Quintin (English)
  • Quintinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintillus (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilian (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilianus (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Quintina (Ancient Roman)
  • Quinta (Ancient Roman)
  • Quintilla (Ancient Roman)