Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Zelda

Zelda was originally used as a nickname for Griseldaa female given name meaning “gray battle” from Germanic elements gris (gray) and hild (battle), though it’s now used as a given name in its own right.

Zelda is also a Yiddish name, the feminine form of Selig, meaning “blessed, happy” in Yiddish.

Origin: Germanic, Yiddish

Variants:

  • Selda (English)
  • Griselda
  • Grizel (Scottish)
  • Griselda (Spanish)
  • Zelde (Yiddish)
  • Zilda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Selig (Yiddish)
  • Zelig (Yiddish)

 

Edwin

Edwin is an English male name composed from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches, blessed, happiness) and wine (friend) meaning “rich friend”, “blessed friend” or “happy friend”.

Nicknames: Ed, Eddy/Eddie, Win/Wyn

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Edwyn (English)
  • Eadwine (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Edvin (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian)
  • Audun (Old Norse)

 

Female forms:

  • Edwina (English)
  • Edweena (English)
  • Edwena (English)
  • Edwyna (English)

 

Marie

Marie is the Czech and French form of Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”.

Marie is also a Japanese feminine name with a variety of different meanings depending on the kanji used. Some meanings I managed to find are “true honest blessing”, “morning honest blessing”, “ten thousand village picture”, “ten thousand village river”, “true honest picture/painting”, or “morning village river”.

I believe in Japanese it’s pronounced mah-ree-ee, with three syllables.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Maria (Latin, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrianian)
  • Mari (Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Mary
  • Maryam (Arabic, Persian)
  • Miriam (Hebrew, English, German)

 

Marie (Japanese kanji) 万 里 江 (ten thousand+ village+ river)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 真 理 絵 (true+ honest+ picture/painting)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 麻 理 恵 (morning+ honest+ blessing)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 真 理 恵 (true+ honest+ blessing)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 麻 里 江 (morning+ village+ river)

Marie (Japanese kanji)万 里 絵 (ten thousand+ village+picture/painting)

 

*I’ve tried very hard to be as accurate as possible when it came to finding the meanings behind the kanji characters, but I’m not a native Japanese speaker nor am I in any way fluent in the language, so it’s possible I’ve made a few mistakes*

Jennifer

Jennifer is the Cornish form of Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (from which the name Guinevere comes from) meaning “fair phantom” or “white phantom” or “white specter” from Celtic elements gwen (white, fair, blessed) and sebara (phantom, demon, spirit, specter, magical being).

Nicknames include: Jen, Jenny/Jennie and Jenna

Origin: Welsh

Variants:

  • Jenifer (English, Cornish)
  • Yenifer (Spanish)
  • Jenna (English)
  • Gwenifer (Cornish)
  • Guinevere (Norman French)
  • Guenevere
  • Gwenhwyfar (Welsh)
  • Gwenevere (English)