Cicely

Cicely is a variant spelling of Cecily, a Medieval English form of Cecilia via Latin Caecilia which is the feminine form of Caecilius, an Ancient Roman family name which comes from Latin caecus meaning “blind; hidden, invisible” via Proto-Italic *kaikos (blind) which derives from PIE *káykos (one-eyed, blind). Cicely is also the name of an herb also known as Myrrhis odorata, also known as sweet cicely, sweet…

Sissy

Sissy is used as a nickname for names like Elizabeth (meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance” from Hebrew ‘Elisheva) , Cecilia/Cecelia (which comes from a Roman family name via Latin caecus meaning “blind”), Priscilla (which also comes from an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “old, ancient”) and Frances (which comes from Late Latin Franciscus meaning “Frenchman” which…

Dillon

Dillon seems like a variant spelling of Dylan at first glance, an Irish name meaning “great tide” or “great flow” and the name of a sea god in Welsh mythology, but Dillon has its own roots. There seems to be a lot of contradictory information on it: it’s an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Duilleáin meaning…

Celinda

Celinda is a female given name, probably a blend of Celia (which either means “heaven, sky” from Latin Caelia or from a shortened form of Cecelia meaning “blind) and Linda, originally a short form of Germanic element linde or lindi meaning “soft, tender” or “linden tree, lime tree” though it could also be associated with Germanic lind meaning “serpent, dragon, snake”. It’s also possible that it’s a variant form…

Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “heaven, sky” from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived…