Haroun

Haroun is the Arabic form of Aaron, possibly meaning “high mountain”, “bright” or “exalted”, though the etymology behind the name is uncertain. It seems more likely that it comes from an Egyptian origin whose meaning has long since been lost. However, according to Wiktionary, it’s likely related to an Ancient Egyptian aha rw meaning “warrior lion” although considering it’s the only source I’ve found that lists it so, I don’t know how accurate that is. In fact I’m almost positive it’s not an accurate etymology, but it would be so cool if it were. Haroun is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Harun (Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Haroon (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Aaron (English, Hebrew)
  • Arron (English)
  • Aaren (English)
  • Aerin (English)
  • Aron (Polish, Croatian, Scandinavian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic)
  • Aarón (Spanish)
  • Áron (Hungarian)

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Akane

Akane (pr. ah-kah-nee) is a Japanese female name with different meanings depending on the kanji used, such as: “madder plant, deep red, brilliant red”, 明音 “clear, bright, tomorrow + sound”, 朱音 “red, scarlet, cinnabar, vermilion + sound”, and other meanings. Akane is also a surname meaning 赤根 “red + root, base, foundation” and 紅音 “crimson + sound”.

Origin: Japanese

Aki

Aki is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning 秋 “autumn” though it has other meanings such as 燦 “brilliant, bright, radiance”, 明 “clear, tomorrow, bright”, 昭 “shining”, 彬 “refined, gentle”, 爽 “refreshing, clear, invigorating”, 晶 “clear, crystal, sparkle”, 暁 “daybreak, dawn”, 彰 “acknowledge”, 晃 “clear”, 亜紀 “Asia, come after, next + record, chronicle”, 愛希 “love, affection + hope, desire, request”, as well as other meanings. Aki is also used as part of other names such as Akio and Akito, both male names, Akira, a unisex name, and Akiko, a female name. Aki is also a Japanese surname.

Aki is also a Finnish male name, the short form of Joakim, the Scandinavian, Macedonian, and Serbian form of Joachim, a contracted form of either Jehoiachin meaning “established by Yahweh”, or Jehoiakim meaning “raised by Yahweh”. Spelled Áki, it comes from Old Norse meaning “ancestor”.

Origin: Japanese, Old Norse

 

Gillian

Gillian is the Medieval feminine form of Julian, which comes from the Roman family name Julius which is either possibly derived from Latin ioulos meaning “downy-bearded” or it could be related to the Roman god Jupiter, which is made up of Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky” and pater meaning “father”.

Gillian is also a surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gileáin meaning “son of Gileán”, the latter derived from personal name Gealán, a diminutive of geal meaning “bright, white”.

The name Gillian has two possible pronunciations, either with a hard like Gilbert, or like a j, like Julian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Jillian (English)

 

Roberto

Roberto is the Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Robert, an English name derived from Germanic Hrodebert meaning “bright fame” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and beraht (bright).

Nicknames are Berto, Rob, or Robbie/Robby

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Robert (English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic)
  • Róbert (Hungarian, Icelandic)
  • Roibeárd (Irish)
  • Roopertti (Finnish)
  • Roberts (Latvian)
  • Robertas (Lithuanian)
  • Raibeart (Scottish)
  • Rupert (English, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Ruperto (Spanish)
  • Robrecht (Dutch)
  • Roparzh (Breton)
  • Robin
  • Robyn

 

Female forms:

  • Roberta
  • Robertina (Italian, Spanish)
  • Robin
  • Robyn
  • Robina
  • Robinia
  • Ruperta (Spanish)

 

April

April is the name of the fourth month of the year in English. Although the etymology behind it is unclear, it’s often been believed to be derived from Latin aperire meaning “to open” in reference to when the flowers and trees begin to bloom. The name has also been linked to Etruscan Apru, the Etruscan form of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, pleasure, and beauty. The first part of the name comes from Greek aphros (foam) in reference to her being born from the sea foam, while the second part is a little trickier; it could be linked to either *-odite (wanderer) or *-dite (bright, shine), the latter being linked to an epithet of the goddess of dawn, Eos. Other theories link it to being pre-Greek in origin.

Origin: Latin, Greek

Variants:

  • Avril (French)
  • Abril (Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Italian)