Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Cassia

Cassia is the female form of Cassius, an Ancient Roman family name possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning “empty, vain”. It also means “cinnamon” in Latin and Greek, deriving from Hebrew qetzi’ah (cassia, cinnamon) (where the names Keziah comes from) from root word qatsa meaning “to cut off, strip off bark”. The name is pronounced either kash-uh or kas-ee-uh.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Kassia (English, Greek)
  • Keziah
  • Kezia
  • Kassiani (Greek)
  • Cássia (Portuguese)

 

Male forms:

  • Cassius (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Kassius (English)

 

Chika

Chika is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings, from Japanese elements chi meaning: (thousand); (knowledge, wisdom); (scatter); (to know, wisdom); and ka meaning: (beautiful, good, excellent); (flower); (add, addition, increase); (permitted, allowed, licensed); (praise, auspicious); (summer); (congratulate, greet, celebrate); (fragrance); (flower, splendor); (fruit); (song, poem); and other meanings. Chikako is another variant of the name ending with the ko (子) ending.

Chika is also an Igbo unisex name meaning “God is the greatest” or “God is supreme”.

Origin: Japanese, Western African (Igbo)

Variants:

  • Chikako (Japanese)

 

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

 

Corliss

Corliss comes from an English surname meaning “carefree person” or “cheerful person” from Old English carleas (careless, reckless, free from care). It likely originated as a nickname for a carefree person or someone who was always happy.

Origin: Old English

 

Clarabel

Clarabel is a variant spelling of Claribel, an elaborate form of Clara, the female form of Clarus meaning meaning “clear, bright, famous”. There was a character named Claribel in Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1610-1611), as well as having been used by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596).

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Claribel
  • Clarabelle
  • Claribell
  • Claribelle

 

Carlotta

Carlotta is the Italian form of Charlotte, itself the French feminine form of Charles which ultimately comes from Karl, a Germanic masculine name meaning “man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Carla (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, English)
  • Karla (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian)
  • Charlotte (French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)
  • Charlotta (Swedish)

 

Male forms:

  • Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan)
  • Carlo (Italian)
  • Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Karl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish)
  • Charles (French, English)
  • Carlitos (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Carlito (Spanish, Portuguese)