Calista

Calista could be the variant form of Callisto, an Ancient Greek female name meaning "most beautiful" derived from Ancient Greek kalós (beauty, beautiful, good) which comes from a Proto-Indo-European source kal-wo-s, a form of *kal- (beautiful). In Greek mythology Callisto was a nymph and a follower of the goddess Artemis who was seduced by Zeus and ended up bearing him a son, Arcas. Callisto was … Continue reading Calista

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Chandler

Chandler derives from an English surname, originally an occupational name for someone who was a maker or seller of candles, or someone who worked in a large household who was responsible for all the wax and candles, as well as soap. The name comes from Old French chandelier via Latin candelarius from candela (candle) from candere (to shine, glitter, glow) from PIE *kand- (to … Continue reading Chandler

Cinder

Cinder is an English word referring to the ash of a fire after it burns out or a nearly burned piece of coal or wood.. It derives from Old English sinder meaning "dross of iron, slag" from Proto-Germanic *sindraz (metal alag; dross) via Proto-Indo-European *sendhro- (coagulating fluid). The letter change from s- to c- was that it would resemble to Old French cendre meaning "ash (of … Continue reading Cinder

Candace

Candace is a female given name derived from kandake from a title used for the ancient queen rulers of Ethiopia . It derives from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen" or "queen mother". Origin: Cushitic Variants: Kandake (Biblical) Candice (English) Candis (English) Candyce (English) Kandyse (English) Kandace (English) Kandice (English)  

Calypso

Calypso is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who was the lover of Odysseus when he ended up shipwrecked on her island Ogygia for seven years though some sources differ on the number of years, as well as whether they had children together. Either way, she refused to let him leave until Zeus sent Hermes to her with instructions to … Continue reading Calypso

Creek

Creek comes from a nature name referring to a stream of water smaller than a river or a small inlet or bay narrower than a cove. It derives from Old Norse kriki meaning "corner, nook". The Creeks are also a Native American tribe, also known as the Muscogees. Creek is also an English surname, likely deriving from a … Continue reading Creek

Chandra

Chandra is an Indian unisex name derived from Sanskirt chand ( चन्द ) meaning “moon" and also meaning "to shine, glow". It derives from Proto-Indo-European root word (s)kand- or *kand- (to shine). In Hindu mythology, Chandra is the Hindu god of the moon. He is depicted as young and beautiful, a two armed god with a club and a lotus, who … Continue reading Chandra

Caro

Caro (pr. care-oh) is usually used as a short form of Caroline or Carolyn or any names beginning with caro-, both of which derive from Germanic Karl from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a free man. Caro may also be a … Continue reading Caro

Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a … Continue reading Cerelia

Carey

Carey is an English unisex name, derived from Irish surname Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of Ciardha", the latter a given name derived from Irish ciar meaning "black" though it may also be derived from Welsh caer meaning "fort, castle", making it a variant form of Carew meaning "fort on the hill". Carey may also be derived from Irish car (love) which comes from Proto-Celtic *kareti (to … Continue reading Carey