C names, Female, Gaelic, Male, Physical Attributes, Surname names, Unisex

Cassidy

Cassidy is an English unisex given name which comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of O Caiside meaning "descendant of Caiside", the latter meaning "curly haired or "curly headed". Nicknames: Cass, Cassie Origin: Gaelic Variants: Kassidy (English) Cassady (English) Cassadee (English) Kassady (English)  

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C names, Elements, Female, Male, Nature, Proto-Germanic, Surname names, Unisex, Water, Word names

Cove

Cove refers to a small coastal inlet or a small, sheltered narrow bay. The origin of the word comes from Old English cofa (chamber; den; ark; cave) derived from Proto-Germanic *kubô (shed, hut). Cove is also a term in architecture which is used for a concave molding or a concave surface forming a junction between a ceiling and a… Continue reading Cove

C names, Female, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Cara

Cara comes from an Italian word, the feminine singular of caro meaning "dear, beloved; precious, expensive"; it comes from Latin cārus (dear, beloved; expensive) via Proto-Italic *kāros (dear) derived from PIE root word *keh₂- (to desire, wish). Cara is also an Irish word meaning "friend" coming from Old Irish carae (friend; relative) via Proto-Celtic *karants (friend) derived from the same PIE root word… Continue reading Cara

C names, Female, Nickname names, Proto-Indo-European, Sky/Heavens, Virtues/Attributes

Ciela

Ciela could possibly be a variant of Cielo, a Spanish female name meaning "sky, heaven", taken from a Spanish title of the virgin Mary, which derives from a PIE root word. It may also have arisen as a short form of names that end in -ciela such as Graciela (the Spanish form of Grace). Origin: Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Cielo (Spanish,… Continue reading Ciela

C names, Female, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Word names

Cadette

Cadette is the feminine singular of cadet in French, which refers to a student in military school training to be an officer in English, derived from French cadet which was used to refer to the younger sons of a noble family who won't inherit. The name comes from Latin capitellum meaning "small head" and "capital or chapter of a… Continue reading Cadette

C names, Female, Male, Physical Attributes, Place names, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex

Courtney

Courtney is an English unisex name originally derived from an English surname derived from a French place called Courtenay, which comes from Curtenus, a Latin name meaning "short" from Latin curtus (short) derived from a PIE root word. It may also have arisen as a nickname for someone with a short nose or someone who was short in stature. As… Continue reading Courtney

C names, Female, Greek mythology, Mythology, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Clytemnestra

Clytemnestra is the wife of Agamemnon in Greek mythology, the sister of Helen and the mother of Orestes, Iphigenia, Elektra, and Chrysothemis. While her husband is away at war she has an affair and they kill Agamememnon when he returns from the Trojan War. She is later killed by her son Orestes to avenge his father. Clytemnestra is made up of Ancient Greek klytos (famous, noble) and mnester (suitor,… Continue reading Clytemnestra

Ancient Greek, C names, Female, Greek mythology, Mythology, Physical Attributes, Virtues/Attributes

Corinne

Corinne is the French form of Corinna, the Latinized form of Ancient Greek Korinna derived from kore meaning "maiden", from which Korë is derived from, the name of an epithet of Persephone, a Greek goddess. Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Corinna (English, German, Latinized Ancient Greek) Corina (English, German, Romanian) Korinna (Ancient Greek) Korina (Greek, English) Corine (English) Korine (English) Coreen (English) Koreen… Continue reading Corinne

C names, Color, Female, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes, White

Candida

Candida is a Late Roman name derived from Latin candidus meaning "white" derived from PIE root word (s)kand- or *kand- (to shine, glow). Nicknames: Candy, Dida, Deedee/DeeDee Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Cándida (Spanish) Cândida (Portuguese) Candide (French)   Male forms: Candidus (Late Roman) Candide (French) Cândido (Portuguese) Cándido (Spanish) Candid (English)  

C names, Color, Earth, Elements, Female, Male, Nature, Orange, Pink, Red/Crimson, Semitic, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes, Water, Word names

Coral

Coral is used to describe the hard skeleton left behind by marine polyps that forms a larger structure like a reef or an atoll. The name comes from Ancient Greek korallion (coral), of uncertain etymology though it could be derived from a Semitic source, from Hebrew goral (small pebble) or Arabic garal (small stone). Coral also refers to a pinkish, orange and red… Continue reading Coral

C names, Female, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Carla

Carla is the feminine form of Carlo (Italian), Carlos (Spanish, Portuguese), and Carl (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English), all of which come from Charles, an English and French name derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting… Continue reading Carla

Ancient Greek, Animals, Birds, C names, Dragon, Female, Greek mythology, Mythological creatures, Mythology, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Sky/Heavens, Snake/Serpent, Swallow, Virtues/Attributes

Celinda

Celinda is a female given name, probably a blend of Celia (which either means "heaven, sky" from Latin Caelia or from a shortened form of Cecelia meaning "blind) and Linda, originally a short form of Germanic element linde or lindi meaning “soft, tender” or “linden tree, lime tree” though it could also be associated with Germanic lind meaning “serpent, dragon, snake”. It's also possible that it's a variant form… Continue reading Celinda

C names, Color, Female, Gold, Male, Moon, Nature, Nickname names, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Cress

Cress is the name of various species of plants with pungent edible leaves such as garden cress, watercress, or winter cress. The name comes from Old English cressa via Middle Low German kerse from Proto-Germanic *krasjon-, deriving from Proto-Indo-European root *gras- (to devour). Cress is also a nickname for names beginning with Cress- such as Cressida (a medieval form of Chryseis, an Ancient Greek female… Continue reading Cress

C names, Emotion/Feelings, Female, Greek mythology, Joy, Literature, Mythology, Nature, Place names, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Carissa

Carissa is a variant spelling of Charissa, itself an elaborated form of Charis which comes from Ancient Greek meaning “grace, kindness, beauty, elegance” derived from khaírō (to be happy) from Proto-Hellenic *kʰəřřō (to rejoice) ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (to yearn for).In Greek mythology, a Charis refers to one of the Charites, referring to some minor goddesses (also known as the Graces) of charm, beauty, grace,… Continue reading Carissa

Anatolian, C names, Emotion/Feelings, Female, Food, Greek mythology, Joy, Mythology, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Cherise

Cherise comes from the Norman-French word for cherry (the modern French word is cerise) which comes from Latin cerasus meaning "cherry; cherry tree" via Ancient Greek kerasós (cherry tree) derived from an ancient Anatalion source. Cherise could also be a variant form of Charisse, a variant spelling of Charissa which is an elaborated form of Charis, an Ancient Greek female name meaning “grace, kindness, beauty,… Continue reading Cherise

C names, Female, Greek mythology, Kin/Family, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Cleopatra

Cleopatra is most famously connected to the last queen of Egypt, the lover of Mark Antony who killed herself rather than surrendering to Octavian's forces. There were actually several princesses with that name, which is why she's Cleopatra VII, as well as also being the name of several minor figures in Greek mythology, including the daughter of… Continue reading Cleopatra

C names, Female, Literature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Hellenic, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Corisande

Corisande is a female given name of uncertain origin and meaning. Its first use was by Castilian writer Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo (1450-1504) in his most famous work, Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul in English), a chivalric romance along the lines of the Arthurian romances. He may have based from Spanish corazón meaning "heart" which comes from… Continue reading Corisande

Animals, Birds, C names, Falcon, Female, Greek mythology, Hawk, Mythology, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Circe

Circe (pr. SUR-see) is the Latinized form of Kirke, the name of a sorceress who turned Odysseus's men into pigs before being forced to turn them back when she was bested by Odysseus with the help of Hermes, after which he spent a year on the island with her before leaving. She is also the aunt of Medea, another famous enchantress. The meaning behind her… Continue reading Circe

Ancient Greek, C names, Female, Greek, Latin, Physical Attributes, Place names, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Cora

Cora is the Latinized form of Greek Korë meaning "maiden"; it was used as an epithet for Persephone, the daughter of Demeter and Zeus and the wife of Hades which makes her the queen of the underworld. Cora could also be a short form of any name beginning with Cor- such as Corinna, which also derives from the same source, or Cordula, which comes from Latin meaning… Continue reading Cora

C names, Female, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Camber

Camber is the name of the legendary first king of Cambria, which is the Latin name for Wales. The name comes from Welsh Cymro, the plural form of Cymry meaning "Welshman" or "compatriot" from Proto-Brythonic *kumroɣ. Camber is also a word that refers to a slight upward curve or arch of a surface. The origin of that word comes from Old… Continue reading Camber