Chord

Chord comes from a musical term, a combination of three or more musical tones sounding simultaenously, as well as a term used in geometery referring to a straight line between two points on a curve. It comes from Latin chorda via Ancient Greek khordḗ (string of gut; cord, string) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (bowels). Chord is also a surname, perhaps a variant spelling of Cord, an occupational name for someone who was a rope-maker which also comes from the same source as Chord.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Khord (English)
  • Cord (English)

 

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Clifford

Clifford is an English male name derived from a surname meaning “ford by a cliff” originally used to refer to someone who lived near one. It’s made up of Old English elements clif (cliff) derived from Proto-Germanic *klibą (to stick) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *gleybʰ; and Old English ford (ford) also derived from Proto-Germanic *furduz (ford) ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing).

Nicknames: Cliff, Ford

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Clarence

Clarence was first created as the name of the title  of a dukedom for the second son of King Edward III, Lionel of Antwerp, in 1362. The name apparently came from the town of Clare, Suffolk, because his first wife was a direct descendant of the powerful de Clare family. Clare is a medieval English form of Clara, the Latin feminine form of Clarus which means “clear, bright, famous” from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to call, cry, summon). Clarence is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Klarence (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Clarencia (English)

 

Cadrian

Cadrian seems to be a modern English name, either an elaborated form of Cade, which has a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • being an English surname derived from a metonymic occupational surname for a cooper (someone who made and repaired barrels) which comes from Old French cade (cask, barrel);
  • it could also be from a Medieval English given name, Cada, which comes from a Germanic root word meaning “lump” or “swelling”;
  • it may also be related to Middle English cade referring to a pet or domestic animal that has been abandoned by its mother and reared by hand. The word itself comes from an unknown origin. As a surname it seems to have originated as a nickname for a gentle or inoffensive person;
  • Cade is also another name for the Juniperus oxycedrus (also known as prickly juniper or cade juniper ( from French genévrier cade);
  • Cade is also the Italian third-person singular present meaning “fall” from Latin cadere (fall).

It’s also possible that Cadrian is another form of Adrian, which comes from Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Cadrian also seems to have some use as a surname although

Origin: Old French, Germanic, Middle English, Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Cadrien (English)
  • Adrian (English)
  • Cade (English)
  • Cadrienne (English) f
  • Cadrianne (English) f

 

Camlann

Camlann comes from the legends of King Arthur, the name of a place and the final battle of King Arthur in which he either dies there, killed by Mordred, or was fatally wounded. The name might be derived *Cambo-landa meaning “crooked land” or *Cambo-glanna meaning “crooked bank (of a river), from Proto-Celtic *kambos (crooked) and either Old Irish lann (land) or Gaulish glanna (bank “of a river”).

Nicknames: Cam

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Gaulish

Variants:

  • Camlan

 

Caledon

Caledon seems to be a shortened form of Caledonia, the old Latin name for Scotland in the northern part of Britain. Apparently the name is derived from a Pictish tribe in northern Scotland called the Caledonii which could be related to Proto-Celtic word *kaletos- meaning “hard/hardy, tough” from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard), perhaps in reference to the rocky land of the area or to the people. Caledon is also a surname derived from a place name, likely referring to someone who came from a town called Caledon.

Nicknames: Cal, Cale

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Female forms:

  • Caledonia

 

Capricorn

Capricorn comes from Latin Capricornus meaning “horned goat” or “having horns like a goat” from Latin capra (goat) and cornu (horn), the name originally referring to a mythical hybrid of a goat fish, a half-goat, half-fish creature with its top half that of a goat and its lower half of a fish. It’s the name of a both a constellation and the tenth sign of the zodiac for those born from December 22 to January 20. Those born under the Capricorn are supposedly serious and diligent, ambitious, resolute, and steady but also spiritual, intutitive, and passionate.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Capricornus (Latin)

 

Chase

Chase is a given name derived from an English surname meaning “chase, hunt” derived from Old French chacier (to hunt) via Latin captiare (catch). It was an occupational surname for a huntsman or given as a nickname for an exceptionally skilled hunter.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Chace (English)