Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Chika

Chika is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings, from Japanese elements chi meaning: (thousand); (knowledge, wisdom); (scatter); (to know, wisdom); and ka meaning: (beautiful, good, excellent); (flower); (add, addition, increase); (permitted, allowed, licensed); (praise, auspicious); (summer); (congratulate, greet, celebrate); (fragrance); (flower, splendor); (fruit); (song, poem); and other meanings. Chikako is another variant of the name ending with the ko (子) ending.

Chika is also an Igbo unisex name meaning “God is the greatest” or “God is supreme”.

Origin: Japanese, Western African (Igbo)

Variants:

  • Chikako (Japanese)

 

Corliss

Corliss comes from an English surname meaning “carefree person” or “cheerful person” from Old English carleas (careless, reckless, free from care). It likely originated as a nickname for a carefree person or someone who was always happy.

Origin: Old English

 

Curtis

Curtis comes from an English surname meaning “courteous” from Old French corteis which is derived from Latin court (court).

Curtis is also the Anglicized form of Hungarian surname Kertész meaning “gardener” from kert (garden).

Nicknames: Curt

Origin: Latin, Hungarian

Variants:

  • Kurtis (English)

 

Clayton

Clayton comes from a surname derived from a place name meaning “clay settlement” from Old English elements claeg (clay) and tun (enclosure, settlement), used to refer to a village on clay soil or near clay soil.

Origin: Old English

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Christopher

Christopher is the English form of Christophoros, a Late Greek name meaning “bearing Christ” from Greek pheros (to carry, to bear, to bring) and Greek given name Christos meaning “anointed”.

Nicknames: Chris, Christie/Christy, Topher, Kit

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Christofer (English)
  • Cristofer (English)
  • Kristopher (English)
  • Kristoffer (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Scandinavian)
  • Christoffer (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Christophe (French)
  • Christoph (German)
  • Christoforos (Greek)
  • Christophoros (Late Greek)
  • Cristoforo (Italian)
  • Cristóbal (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Christophera
  • Christofera

 

Cato

Cato is an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin. Cato is also a Dutch diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of Katherine. Katherine comes from Greek name Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: Latin, Greek, Coptic

 

 

Charlie

Charlie is often used as a short form of Charles or its feminine forms Charlotte and Charlene, derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Charley
  • Charles (m)
  • Charlotte (f)
  • Charlene (f)

 

Chadwick

Chadwick comes from an English surname derived from several place names in England meaning “Chad’s settlement” or “settlement belonging to Chad”, Chad being a given name from Old English Ceadda, possibly derived from Welsh cad meaning “battle”; combined with -wick meaning “settlement, abode, village”.

Origin: Old English, Welsh