Leon

Leon derives from Greek leon meaning “lion” and is the Latin cognate of Leo. Leon is also a surname which may derive from the given name, originally a nickname for someone who was a fierce warrior, though it may also derive from the name of a city in Spain, León, which may come from Latin legio meaning “legion” since it was originally a military encampment for the Roman legions.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin

Variants:

  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Leonius (Late Roman)
  • León (Spanish)
  • Leoncio (Spanish)
  • Léon (French)
  • Léo (French)
  • Léonce (French)
  • Levon (Armenian)
  • Leoš (Czech)
  • Leo (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman)
  • Lionel (French, English)
  • Levan (Georgian)
  • Leone (Italian)
  • Leonzio (Italian)
  • Leonas (Lithuanian)
  • Leonti (Russian)
  • Leontiy (Russian)
  • Leonty (Russian)

 

Female form:

  • Leona (German, English)
  • Leola (English)
  • Leone (English)
  • Leontina (Italian, Late Roman)
  • Leontyne (English)
  • Leontine (German, English)
  • Léontine (French)
  • Léone (French)
  • Leonie (German, Dutch, English)
  • Léonie (French)
  • Leonia (Late Roman)

 

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Hana

Hana is a multicultural name with a variety of meanings:

  • it is the Czech, Slovak, and Croatian form of Hannah, which comes from Hebrew Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • it’s also an Arabic female name meaning “bliss, happiness”;
  • Hana is also a Korean female name meaning “one”;
  • it’s also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as: “flower” () pr “flower; splendor” (), though there may be other meanings depending on the kanji used;
  • it also means “work” or “craft” in Hawaiian;
  • hana is also a word in Maori which means “to shine, glow, radiate, give out heat” as a verb and “flame, glow, warmth, heat, radiance” as a noun;
  • the name may also be derived from Albanian hënë meaning “moon”.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic, Korean, Japanese, Hawaiian, Maori, Albanian

Variants:

  • Hanaa (Arabic)
  • Hana’a (Arabic)
  • Hannah (English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Hanna
  • Ha-na (Korean)

 

하나 (Korean Hangul)

هناء (Arabic)

 

Marta

Marta is a cognate of Martha, which comes from Aramaic meaning “lady, mistress”, the feminine form of mar/mara (lord, master).

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Martha (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek)
  • Martta (Finnish)
  • Marthe (French, Norwegian)
  • Marte (Norwegian)
  • Márta (Hungarian)
  • Morta (Lithuanian)
  • Maata (Maori)
  • Marfa (Russian)

 

Dario

Dario is the Italian and Croatian form of Darius, the Roman form of Greek Dareios which ultimately comes from Persian Dārayavahush meaning “to possess excellence” or “he who holds firm to good” from dâraya (to possess, to hold) and vahu (good). Dario is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Persian

Variants:

  • Dário (Portuguese)
  • Darío (Spanish)
  • Darius (English, Lithuanian, Romanian)
  • Dareios (Ancient Greek)
  • Darayavahush (Old Persian)
  • Daryawesh (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Darijus (Lithuanian)
  • Dariush (Persian)
  • Daryush (Persian)
  • Dariusz (Polish)

 

Female forms:

  • Daria (Italian, Polish, Romanian, Croatian, Late Greek, English)
  • Dareia (Late Greek)
  • Darija (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Darya (Russian, Belarusian)
  • Darja (Slovene, Czech)
  • Tarja (Finnish)
  • Dariya (Ukrainian)
  • Odarka (Ukrainian)

 

Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning “gracious, dear”.

Origin: Slavic

 

Variants:

  • Myla (English)
  • Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian)
  • Miléna (Hungarian)
  • Milica (Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Ludmila (Czech, Russian)
  • Camilla (English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman)
  • Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Milagros (Spanish)

 

Male forms:

  • Milan (Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch)
  • Milen (Bulgarian)
  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miloš (Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Mile (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Miloje (Serbian)

 

Lana

Lana is an Arabic female name deriving from a root word meaning “soft, tender, gentle”. It’s also a short form of names like Svetlana, a Slavic female name meaning “light” from Slavic svet (light), or Alana, feminine form of Alan, a Celtic name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to meaning either “little rock” or “handsome” though it might also be related to Alaunus, a Gaulish god of healing and prophecy whose name could be related to Proto-Celtic *al(aun) meaning “nourishing” or *alo meaning “feed, raise, nurture” or possibly meaning “shining one”.

Lana is also a Hawaiian name meaning “calm as still waters” or “afloat”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic, Celtic, Hawaiian

 

لانا (Arabic)

 

Nika

Nika is a unisex given name with several possible meanings. It’s a Russian short form of Veronika which ultimately comes from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringer of victory, bringing victory”, or any name ending in -nika, as well as also being a short form of Nikita, the Russian form of Greek Niketas meaning “winner, victor”. Nika is also the feminine form of male given name Nikola, the Slavic form of Nicholas “victory of the people”, as well as also being the (male) dimininutive of Nikoloz, the Georgian form of Nicholas.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nica (Spanish, Swedish)

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Andrea

Andrea is both a male name in Italy, the Italian form of Greek Andreas meaning “manly, masculine”, while it’s also a female name in other parts of the world, being the feminine form of Andrew, which also happens to be the English form of Greek Andreas.

Origin: Greek

Male variants:

  • Andreas (Ancient Greek)
  • Andrew (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Andreina (Italian)
  • Andra (English, Romanian)
  • Andrina (English)