Marius

Marius comes from a Roman family name which can either be used as a masculine form of Maria (the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian…

Martine

Martine is the French, Dutch, and Norwegian feminine form of Martin which ultimately derives from the name of the Roman war of god, Mars, who played a prominent role in Roman worship, including being linked to agricultural functions. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” or from Latin marcus meaning “large…

Theresa

Theresa is a variant spelling of Teresa, a female given name of uncertain origin. The name seems to have first been used by the Spanish wife of St. Paulinus of Nola, a Roman poet, writer, and senator; her name was Therasia. The name may have come from the name of a Greek island, it’s origin unknown. It could be…

Essex

Essex comes from an English surname which comes from the name of a county in England, which gets its name from an ancient kingdom. The name is made up of Old English east (east) and Seaxe (Saxon) meaning “East Saxon”; Seaxe is the plural form of Seaxa (Saxon) which comes from Old English seax meaning “knife, dagger” via Proto-Germanic *sahsą (dagger,…

Marcus

Marcus is a Latin praenomen (given name) of uncertain etymology though it’s likely that it derives from Mars, the Roman god of war and agriculture. The name itself is of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” or from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. However, it’s also possible that Mars is related to a…

Shira

Shira is a Hebrew female name meaning “poetry” or “singing/song”. Shira is also a Jewish surname originating from the given name though it could also be an Americanized spelling of Shearer, an occupational name for someone who sheared sheep, or someone who used scissors to trim finished cloth or cut off any excessive fabric. The origin of…

Tessa

Tessa is a diminutive of Teresa/Theresa, a name of uncertain etymology. It could be derived from Greek theros meaning “summer; harvest, crop; heat” or from Greek therizo meaning “to reap, cut”. It could also possibly be related to Greek ther meaning “wild beast; beast of prey” or Greek thēráō “to hunt”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Tess (English, Dutch) Tessie (English) Teresa (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish,…

Sawyer

Sawyer comes from an English surname, an occupational name for someone who sawed wood, made up from saw, referring to a tool with toothed blades used for cutting hard substances, which comes from Proto-Germanic *sago (saw) derived from PIE root word *sek- (to cut, sever). Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Gideon

Gideon is the name of a judge and military leader in the Old Testament, the name coming from Hebrew meaning “feller” or “hewer”, essentially “one who cuts down”. Gideon is also a surname which originates from the given name. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Gedeon (Biblical Greek, French, Hungarian) Gédéon (French) Gid’on (Biblical Hebrew)