Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Andrea

Andrea is both a male name in Italy, the Italian form of Greek Andreas meaning “manly, masculine”, while it’s also a female name in other parts of the world, being the feminine form of Andrew, which also happens to be the English form of Greek Andreas.

Origin: Greek

Male variants:

  • Andreas (Ancient Greek)
  • Andrew (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Andreina (Italian)
  • Andra (English, Romanian)
  • Andrina (English)

 

Gabriel

Gabriel is a male name, from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Gabe

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Female forms:

  • Gabrielle (French, English)
  • Gabriella (Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)
  • Gavriila (Russian)

 

Oliver

Oliver is a male given name that has two possible origins. The first is that it could be from Germanic Alfhar from Old Norse Alvar meaning “elf warrior” or “elf army” from Old Norse elements alfr (elf) and arr (warrior, army); or it’s derived from another Old Norse name, Áleifr, meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Oliver is also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Olly/Ollie

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Olivier (Dutch, French)
  • Olivér (Hungarian)
  • Oliviero (Italian)
  • Oliwier (Polish)

 

Female forms:

  • Olivera (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Olivette (English)
  • Olivia (English, Spanish, Italian, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

 

David

David comes from a Hebrew male name meaning “beloved”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Dave, Davey/Davie/Davi

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dávid (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Dovid (Yiddish)
  • Daud (Arabic, Indonesian)
  • Dawud (Arabic)
  • Dawood (Arabic)
  • Dawid (Polish, Biblical Hebrew)
  • Daveth (Cornish)
  • Taavet (Estonian)
  • Taavetti (Finnish)
  • Davit (Georgian)
  • Daviti (Georgian)
  • Dáibhí (Irish)
  • Dàibhidh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Daividh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Davi (Portuguese Brazilian)
  • Davide (Italian)
  • Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • Davud (Persian)
  • Dafydd (Welsh)
  • Dewi (Welsh)
  • Dewydd (Old Welsh)
  • Davíd (Icelandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Davina (English)
  • Davena (English)
  • Davinia (English)
  • Davida (English)

Adam

Adam is a male name that derives from Hebrew. It has various meanings such as “man”, “earth, soil, ground”, and “red”. According to Judaism, Christianty, and Islam, Adam was the first man ever created, along with Eve. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Addy is a Medieval diminutive for Adam.

Origin: Hebrew

Male variants:

  • Adama (unisex)
  • Adamo (Italian)
  • Adán (Spanish)
  • Adão (Portuguese)
  • Aatami (Finnish)
  • Akamu (Hawaiian)
  • Ádám (Hungarian)
  • Ádhamh (Irish)
  • Adomas (Lithuanian)
  • Adem (Turkish)
  • Adamu (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Adama (Hebrew, English)
  • Adamina (English)

 

Marie

Marie is the Czech and French form of Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”.

Marie is also a Japanese feminine name with a variety of different meanings depending on the kanji used. Some meanings I managed to find are “true honest blessing”, “morning honest blessing”, “ten thousand village picture”, “ten thousand village river”, “true honest picture/painting”, or “morning village river”.

I believe in Japanese it’s pronounced mah-ree-ee, with three syllables.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Maria (Latin, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrianian)
  • Mari (Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Mary
  • Maryam (Arabic, Persian)
  • Miriam (Hebrew, English, German)

 

Marie (Japanese kanji) 万 里 江 (ten thousand+ village+ river)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 真 理 絵 (true+ honest+ picture/painting)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 麻 理 恵 (morning+ honest+ blessing)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 真 理 恵 (true+ honest+ blessing)

Marie (Japanese kanji) 麻 里 江 (morning+ village+ river)

Marie (Japanese kanji)万 里 絵 (ten thousand+ village+picture/painting)

 

*I’ve tried very hard to be as accurate as possible when it came to finding the meanings behind the kanji characters, but I’m not a native Japanese speaker nor am I in any way fluent in the language, so it’s possible I’ve made a few mistakes*

Daniel

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: a male name meaning “God is my judge”.

As well as being a given name, Daniel is also a surname from the same source.

Nicknames include Danny/Dannie/Danni and Dan.

Variants:

  • Danilo (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian)
  • Daniele (Italian)
  • Danijel (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Danyal (Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish)
  • Taniel (Armenian)
  • Danel (Basque)
  • Deniel (Breton)
  • Danail (Bulgarian)
  • Daniël (Dutch)
  • Dániel (Hungarian, Faroese)
  • Dánjal (Faroese)
  • Taneli (Finnish)
  • Daníel (Icelandic)
  • Daniels (Latvian)
  • Danielius (Lithuanian)
  • Daniil (Russian)
  • Deiniol (Welsh)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Danielle (French, English)
  • Danièle (French)
  • Daniela (Bulgarian, Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Macedonian, English)
  • Daniella (English)
  • Dana (Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew)
  • Danijela (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian)
  • Daniëlle (Dutch)

 

Martin

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Martin comes from the Roman name Martinus meaning “belonging to Mars”, Mars being the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

As well as being a given name, Martin is also a common surname derived from the same source.

Marty/Martie is an obvious nickname for Martin.

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)