Dune

Dune is an English word referring to a sand hill formed by the wind in deserts or near coastal regions; the word itself comes from Middle Dutch dūne, which itself could possibly be derived from Gaulish dunum (hill) or from Proto-Celtic dunom (stronghold, rampart). It derives from PIE *dʰewh₂- (to close, finish, come full circle). Origin: … Continue reading Dune

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Denzil

Denzil has several possible meanings but nothing concrete, and they may not even be accurate. It’s from a surname denoting someone who came from a place called Denzell in Cornwall. I’ve seen it listed as meaning “fort”, “fertile highland” or “high stronghold”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a pet form of German name Denz, a short … Continue reading Denzil

Drew

Drew is used as a short form of Andrew, which is the English form of Greek male name Andreas, derived from Greek andreios meaning “manly, masculine”. It's also the anglicized form of Drogo, itself an Ancient Germanic personal name either derived from Gothic meaning "to bear", "to carry" or from an Old Saxon root meaning "ghost" or "phantom". Drew is also a surname … Continue reading Drew

Darby

Darby comes from an English surname derived from a place name. It's made up frm Old Norse djúr (deer) and býr (settlement, farm) meaning "deer settlement" or "deer farm".  Origin: Old Norse Variants: Derby (English)  

Delaney

Delaney comes from an English surname with two possible sources: the first is that it may be derived from a Norman French place name, de l'aunaie, meaning "from the alder grove"; the second is that it comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Ó Dubhshláine meaning "descendant of Dubhshláine", the latter made up from Gaelic elements dubh (black) and … Continue reading Delaney

December

December is the twelfth month of the year which derives from Latin decem meaning "ten" derived from a Proto-Indo-European root. In the Roman calender, December was originally the tenth month of the year which originally consisted of ten months before the addition of two more months. Nicknames: Ember, Dez, Dezzy/Desi, Dee Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Drake

Drake comes from an English surname meaning "dragon, snake"  from Old English Draca, which comes from Latin draco (dragon) derived from Proto-Indo-European drakon (dragon, serpent) from *derḱ- (to see). Drake is also a Middle English word meaning "male duck" from Proto-Germanic *anudrekô, made up of *anudz via Proto-Indo-European *h₂énh₂ts (duck) and Proto-Germanic *rekô (king, chief) via Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (king, chief). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Drayke (English) Draki (Old Norse) Draco (Latinized Ancient … Continue reading Drake

Devere

Devere comes from a French surname meaning "of Ver" or "from Ver", referring to someone who came from a town called Vere. It's made up from French de (of, from) and  Vere meaning "alder" which comes from a Gaulish word so the name essentially means "from the alders". Origin: French, Gaulish  

Dwayne

Dwayne is a variant spelling of Duane, itself the anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of Dubhán", the latter derived from Irish dubh meaning "dark, black" with the diminutive suffix -an, so the name means "little dark one". Origin: Gaelic Variants: Duane (English, Irish) Dewayne (English) Dewain (English) Dwain (English) Devin (English, Irish) Devyn (English)   Female forms: Duana (English) … Continue reading Dwayne

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan