Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Linus

Linus is the name of 2 sons of the Greek god Apollo in Greek mythology by different mothers. One of them, whom he fathered with one of the Muses, was a great musician who invented the melody and rhythm. His name comes Greek linos meaning “flax”.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Linos (Ancient Greek, Greek)
  • Lino (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Galician)
  • Linas (Lithuanian)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)

 

Finn

Finn comes from an Irish name meaning “fair”, “blessed” or “white” derived from Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finn is the older spelling of Fionn, which belongs to the name of a warrior in Irish myth known as Fionn mac Cumhaill (or Finn MacCool in English) and the leader of the Fianna. His birth name was Deimne but he was later nicknamed Fionn when his hair turned prematurely white.

Finn also comes from Old Norse Finnr meaning “a Finn, a Sami, Lapp”, a given name and byname used to refer to someone who came from Finland or was part of the Sami people (also known as Lapps). Although the origin behind  finnr is uncertain it has been linked to Old Norse meaning “wanderer”. Finnr is the name of a dawrf mentioned in the Völuspá, the first poem in the Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems. Finn is also a surname which could be be derived from both sources, as well as being a short form of names like Finley, Finnegan, or Thorfinn/Torfinn

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Old Norse

Varinats:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finnagán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Fionnán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Finnán (older form of Fionnán)
  • Finnr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Finnur (Icelandic)
  • Fína (Greenlandic)
  • Finna (Greenlandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Fiona (Scottish, English)
  • Finna (female form of Finnr; Old Norse, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian)

 

Ella

Ella comes from Germanic element alja meaning “other, another, foreign” and from which the name Eleanor/Alianor comes from. Ella could also be a nickname for names beginning and ending with ella such as Gabriella (feminine form of Gabriel meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”) and Daniella (feminine form of Daniel meaning “God is my judge”), Elizabeth (meaning “God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”) and Eleanor, which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”. Ella is also the Spanish and Italian word for “she”.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alia (Ancient Germanic)

 

Mia

Mia was originally used as a diminutive of Maria, the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Mia could also be a nickname for names such as Amelia, Emily, and Emilia though it can also be used as a given name.

Mia is also a Japanese female name. The first part of the kanji 未 (mi) refers to the eighth sign of the Chinese zodiac, the goat, or it could mean “not yet, un-“, or “future”while the second kanji (a) means “Asia; rank next; come after”. There could be other meanings depending on the kanji used. Mia is also an Italian word meaning “my” or “mine”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Miya (English, Japanese)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)

 

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)