Anna-Maria

Anna-Maria is a female given name, a combination of Anna and Maria:

  • Anna is the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • Maria comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr“love”. Maria is also the feminine form of Marius, a Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it’s possible that Mars was derived from an older source, perhaps from from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture) of unknown meaning. Mars could also be the contracted form of an older name, Mavors (or Mavort) which could come from Latin verb mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn), essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same  Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Annamaria (Italian, English)
  • Annamária (Hungarian)
  • Annemarie (Dutch, German)
  • Annmarie (English)

 

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Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Martin

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Martin comes from the Roman name Martinus meaning “belonging to Mars”, Mars being the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

As well as being a given name, Martin is also a common surname derived from the same source.

Marty/Martie is an obvious nickname for Martin.

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)