Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)

 

Claudia

Claudia is the feminine form of Claudius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “lame, crippled” from Latin claudus. 

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Klaudia (Polish, Slovak)
  • Klavdiya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Klaudija (Croatian)
  • Claudette (French, English)
  • Claudine (French, English)
  • Cláudia (Portuguese)
  • Klavdija (Slovene)
  • Gladys (Welsh, English)
  • Claude (French, English)
  • Claudie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Claudius (Ancient Roman)
  • Claudio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Cláudio (Portuguese)
  • Klaudio (Croatian)
  • Klaudijs (Latvian)
  • Klaudiusz (Polish)
  • Claudiu (Romanian)
  • Claud (English)
  • Claude (French)

Mia

Mia was originally used as a diminutive of Maria, the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Mia could also be a nickname for names such as Amelia, Emily, and Emilia though it can also be used as a given name.

Mia is also a Japanese female name. The first part of the kanji 未 (mi) refers to the eighth sign of the Chinese zodiac, the goat, or it could mean “not yet, un-“, or “future”while the second kanji (a) means “Asia; rank next; come after”. There could be other meanings depending on the kanji used. Mia is also an Italian word meaning “my” or “mine”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Miya (English, Japanese)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)

 

Melanie

Melanie is the English form of Mélanie, the French form of Latin Melania derived from Ancient Greek melas meaning “black, dark”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Mélanie (French)
  • Melany (English)
  • Mellony (English)
  • Mellanie (English)
  • Melánie (Czech)
  • Melaina (Greek)
  • Melánia (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Melania (Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman)
  • Melanija (Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian, Lithuanian)
  • Melani (Croatian, Slovene, Modern Greek, English)

 

Alexander

Alexander is the Latinized form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” from Greek elements alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man). In Greek mythology, it was another name for the Trojan prince Paris, famous for abducting Helen, wife of Menelaus, which started the ten year Trojan war. It’s also the name of Alexander the Great, king of Macedon, who created one of the largest empires in the ancient world. Alexander is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Alex, Xander, Lex, Ander, Sandy, Sander

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alexandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Aleksander (Polish, Slovene, Albanian, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Female forms:

  • Alexandra (Ancient Greek, English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Alexandria (English, Ancient Greek)
  • Alexandrina (Portuguese, English)
  • Aleksandra (Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Estonian)

 

Peter

Peter is the English form of Greek Petros meaning “stone, rock”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Pete, Petey/Petie

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Petros (Greek, Armenian)
  • Petrus (German, Dutch)
  • Pieter (Dutch)
  • Pier (Dutch, Italian, English)
  • Piers  (Medieval English, Medieval French)
  • Peers (English)
  • Peder (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Petter (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Butrus (Arabic)
  • Botros (Arabic)
  • Boutros (Arabic, Coptic)
  • Bedros (Armenian)
  • Peru (Basque)
  • Petri (Basque, Finnish)
  • Peio (Basque)
  • Petteri (Finnish)
  • Pietari (Finnish)
  • Per (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Breton)
  • Perig (Breton diminutive of Per)
  • Pierrick (Breton, French)
  • Pierre (French, Swedish)
  • Petar (Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Penko (Bulgarian diminutive of Petar)
  • Pere (Catalan)
  • Petru (Corsican, Romanian)
  • Petar (Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
  • Petre (Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Petr (Czech)
  • Petro (Ukrainian, Esperanto)
  • Peeter (Estonian)
  • Petur (Faroese)
  • Pitter (Frisian, Limburgish)
  • Pika (Hawaiian)
  • Péter (Hungarian)
  • Pétur (Icelandic)
  • Peadar (Irish, Scottish)
  • Piaras (Irish)
  • Pietro (Italian)
  • Pierino (Italian diminutive of Pietro)
  • Piero (Italian)
  • Petras (Lithuanian)
  • Petera (Maori)
  • Petruccio (Italiam medieval diminutive of Pietro)
  • Pèire (Occitan)
  • Piotr (Polish)
  • Pedro (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Pedrinho (Portuguese diminutive of Pedro)
  • Pyotr (Russian)
  • Petya (Russian diminutive of Pyotr)
  • Petia (Russian diminutive of Pyotr)
  • Pedr (Welsh)
  • Perrin (French diminutive of Pierre)
  • Piere (Swedish)

 

Female forms:

  • Petra (English, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish)
  • Petrina (English diminutive of Petra)
  • Pietra (Italian)
  • Piera (Italian)
  • Pierina (Italian diminutive of Piero)
  • Peta (English Australian)
  • Perrine (French)
  • Pierrette (French diminutive of Pierre)