Chloe

Chloe comes from Ancient Greek khlóē meaning "young green shoot", used as an epithet for the Greek goddess of agriculture Demeter. It comes from Proto-Indo-European ǵʰelh₃- (to flourish, to shine, green, yellow). Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Khloe (English) Chloé (French) Cloé (French, Portuguese) Cloe (Spanish, Italian) Chloë  

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Henry

Henry comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, rule). It's also a surname derived form the given name. Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Heimirich (Ancient Germanic) Heinrich (Ancient Germanic, German) Henricus (Dutch, Latinized Ancient Germanic) Henrik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian) Endika (Basque) Enric (Catalan) Jindřich (Czech) Herry (Medieval … Continue reading Henry

Octavia

Octavia is the feminine form of Octavius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "eighth" from Latin octavus. Origin: Latin Variants: Ottavia (Italian) Octávia (Portuguese) Otávia (Brazilian Portuguese) Octavie (French)   Male forms: Octavio (Spanish) Octavius (Ancient Roman) Ottavio (Italian) Octávio (Portuguese) Otávio (Brazilian Portuguese) Octave (French)  

Devon

Devon is the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area known as the Dumnonii which is made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning "deep" or "world" and *nanto meaning "stream" or "valley" so the name would mean "deep valley" or "deep stream". It may also be a variant spelling … Continue reading Devon

Orin

Orin could be a variant of Orrin, itself an anglicized form of Odhrán, an Irish male name meaning "little pale green one", or a variant spelling of Oren, a Hebrew male name meaning "pine tree". It's also a surname originating from the given name. Orin is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji … Continue reading Orin

Seven

Seven comes from the English word for 7, a number long since considered lucky, such as the idea of a seventh son of a seventh son being lucky. It comes from Proto-Germanic *sebun derived from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥ (seven). Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning "provisions, supplies" from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess  

Kyle

Kyle comes from a Scottish surname likely derived from Scottish Gaelic caol meaning "narrows", "strait", "channel". It may also be derived from Scottish Gaelic coille meaning "wood, forest". Origin: Scottish Gaelic Female forms: Kyla (English)  

Isabel

Isabel is the medieval Occitan form of Elizabeth, the English form of Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning "my God is an oath" or "my God is abundance". Nicknames: Izzy/Izzie, Bel/Belle Origin: Hebrew Variants: Isabelle (French, English, German, Dutch) Isabell (German, English) Isabella (English, Italian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian) Isabela (Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian) Ysabel (Spanish) Izabel (Brazilian Portuguese) Izabella … Continue reading Isabel

Wallace

Wallace comes from a Scottish and English surname meaning "Welsh" or "foreigner" from Norman French word waleis (foreign), originally used to refer to someone who was a Welshman or who lived at the border between England and Wales. Nicknames: Wally/Wallie Origin: Norman French Variants: Wallis (English) Walleis Waleis