Feidelm

Feidelm is an Irish female name which is borne by several women in Irish mythology, including the daughter of Conchobar Mac Nessa (the King of Ulster in the Ulster cycle),  and a female prophetess and learned poet. The meaning behind the name is unknown. It could possibly be a feminine form of Feidlimid (also spelled Féilim), a male name…

Ffion

Ffion (pr. fee-awn; Forvo) is a Welsh female name and word meaning “foxglove; purple foxglove” which seems to be derived from a Proto-Celtic source. Origin: Proto-Celtic  

Felicity

Felicity is an English female given name derived from the word meaning “happiness” which comes from Latin felicitas (happiness, felicity; fruitful, fertility; success, good fortune) which derives from a PIE root word *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suckle, nurse). In Roman mythology, Felicitas is the personification of good fortune and luck. Nicknames: Flicka, Lissy Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Felicitas (Late Roman, German)…

Friday

Friday comes from Old English frīġedæġ meaning “Frigg’s day”, Frigg being the Norse goddess of marriage, childbirth, and the earth. She is also depicted as having the power of foreknowledge and is the wife of Odin. Frigg comes from an Old Norse source meaning “beloved” or “to love” deriving from a PIE root word meaning “to love, to please”. Friday is…

Farrah

Farrah is a variant spelling of Farah, an Arabic female name (and occasionally a male name) meaning “joy”. Farah is also an Arabic surname originating from the given name. Farrah is also an English surname, a variant of Farrar, an occupational name for a smith or an ironworker which comes from Middle English ferreor (iron worker, smith) via Latin ferrum…

Fiera

Fiera is a word in Esperanto meaning “proud”; it’s also a word in Spanish meaning “wild animal, wild beast” and also “wild” which comes from Latin fera (wild animal, beast) via ferus (wild, savage; uncivilized) which ultimately derives from PIE *ǵʰwer- (wild; wild animal). Fiera is also an Italian word meaning “fair, exhibition” which comes from Late Latin feria (festival, holy…

Fay

Fay is an English unisex name which derives from several sources: the first is that it’s another word for “fairy”, coming from Middle English faie via Latin fata meaning “destiny, fate” derived from PIE root word *bʰeh₂- (to speak, say). In Arthurian legend, it’s the epithet of Morgan le Fay (meaning Morgan the fairy); it’s also been used as a nickname for…

Fawn

Fawn is the term for a young deer as well as a light yellowish-brown color. It comes from Old French faon via Latin fētus meaning “pregnant, full of young” derived from PIE *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suckle, nurse). Fawn is also an English word, a verb used to refer to someone who is seeking favor from someone through flattery, or to behave affectionately over…

Flannery

Flannery comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Ó Flannghaile meaning “descendant of Flannghal”, Flannghal meaning “red valor”, “red fury”, or “red ardor” made up from Irish flann (red, blood-red) derived from PIE root word *welh₃- (to hit, to strike); and gal (warlike ardor; valor, fury) from Proto-Celtic *galā (might, ability). Flannery could also be the anglicized form of Flannabhra meaning “red eyebrows” from Irish fabhra (eyelash;…

Flora

Flora is the name of the Roman goddess of flowers, nature, and spring and the wife of Favonius, the Roman counterpart of the Greek god of the west wind; her Greek counterpart is Chloris. Flora comes from Latin flos meaning “blossom, flower” derived from PIE root word *bʰleh₃- (bloom, flower). Flora is also used to refer to plant life. It’s also a…