Finn

Finn comes from an Irish name meaning “fair”, “blessed” or “white” derived from Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finn is the older spelling of Fionn, which belongs to the name of a warrior in Irish myth known as Fionn mac Cumhaill (or Finn MacCool in English) and the leader of the Fianna. His birth name was Deimne but he was later nicknamed Fionn when his hair turned prematurely white.

Finn also comes from Old Norse Finnr meaning “a Finn, a Sami, Lapp”, a given name and byname used to refer to someone who came from Finland or was part of the Sami people (also known as Lapps). Although the origin behind  finnr is uncertain it has been linked to Old Norse meaning “wanderer”. Finnr is the name of a dawrf mentioned in the Völuspá, the first poem in the Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems. Finn is also a surname which could be be derived from both sources, as well as being a short form of names like Finley, Finnegan, or Thorfinn/Torfinn

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Old Norse

Varinats:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finnagán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Fionnán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Finnán (older form of Fionnán)
  • Finnr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Finnur (Icelandic)
  • Fína (Greenlandic)
  • Finna (Greenlandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Fiona (Scottish, English)
  • Finna (female form of Finnr; Old Norse, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)

 

Frey

Frey is a variant of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the twin brother of Freya, as well as the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak. His name comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjaz meaning “lord”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Freyr (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Frej (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frei

 

Female forms:

  • Freya (Norse mythology, English)
  • Freyja (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Freja (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frea (Norse mythology)
  • Frøya (Norwegian)

 

Fuyu

Fuyu is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning 冬 “winter” though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used, such as Fuyuki, a male name meaning 冬木 “winter + tree, wood, timber” or 冬樹 “winter + tree, to plant, to cultivate” and likely other meanings; Fuyumi, a Japanese female name meaning: 冬美 “winter + beauty, beautiful”, 冬実 “winter + reality, truth”, 不由美 “not, non, un- + cause, reason + beauty, beautiful”; and Fuyuka, 冬佳 “winter +beautiful, good, auspicious”, 冬香 “winter +fragrance”, 冬加 “winter +add, addition, increase”, 冬可 “winter +permitted, allowed”, 冬花 “winter +flower”, and other meanings.

Origin: Japanese

Franklin

Origin: Anglo-Norman

Meaning: originally a surname which comes from Middle English frankeleyn meaning “free man” from Old French fraunclein referring to someone who owned land but was not of noble birth.

Nicknames include: Frank and Franky/Frankie

Variants:

  • Franklyn

 

 

Frederick

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: the English form of German Friedrich meaning “peaceful ruler” from Germanic elements frid (peace) and ric (ruler, power).

Some nicknames for Frederick are Fred, Freddy/Freddie, and Rick or Ricky/Rickie.

Variants:

  • Fredric (English)
  • Fredrick (English)
  • Friedrich (German)
  • Frédéric (French)
  • Frederic (French, English)
  • Friduric (Ancient Germanic)
  • Frederik (Danish, Dutch)
  • Fredrik (Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Frigyes (Hungarian)
  • Friđik (Icelandic)
  • Federico (Spanish, Italian)
  • Federigo (Italian)
  • Fricis (Latvian)
  • Frīdrihs (Latvian)
  • Fryderyk (Polish)
  • Frederico (Portuguese)
  • Friderik (Slovene)
  • Fridericus (Latin)
  • Frederikas (Lithuanian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Frederica (English, Portuguese)
  • Frédérique (French)
  • Frederikke (Danish)
  • Fredrika (Swedish, Finnish)
  • Friederike (German)
  • Friđrika (Icelandic)
  • Federica (Italian)
  • Fryderyka (Polish)