Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Risa

Risa is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, made of Japanese elements ri meaning: 梨 “pear”, 里 “village, hometown”, 理 “reason, logic”, “jasmine”; and sa meaning: 紗 “gauze”, 沙 “sand”,  “assistant, help”; and likely other meanings. It could also be a short form of names like Parisa, a Persian name meaning “fairy, like a fairy” or Marisa, a combination of given names Maria (the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”) and Luisa (the feminine form of Luis, the Spanish form of Louis ultimately derived from a Germanic name meaning “famous war/battle”

Risa is also the Spanish word for “laughter, laugh” which comes from Latin risus/rideo. 

Origin: Japanese, Persian, Hebrew, Germanic, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Marisa
  • Parisa

 

Clarabel

Clarabel is a variant spelling of Claribel, an elaborate form of Clara, the female form of Clarus meaning meaning “clear, bright, famous”. There was a character named Claribel in Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1610-1611), as well as having been used by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596).

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Claribel
  • Clarabelle
  • Claribell
  • Claribelle

 

Roddy

Roddy is a nickname for Roderick meaning “famous power” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and ric (power), or it could be a short form of Rodney, a surname meaning “Hroda’s island”, Hroda being a Germanic given name meaning “fame”, and Old English eg (island).

Origin: Germanic, Old English

Variants:

  • Roderick (English, Scottish, Welsh)
  • Roderic (Catalan, English)
  • Rodney (English)
  • Rodrigo (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Galician)
  • Hroderich (Ancient Germanic)

Orlanda

Orlanda is the feminine form of Orlandoitself the Italian form of Roland, a Germanic male name meaning “famous land” or “fame land” composed from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land).

Origin: Germanic

Female variants:

  • Rolande (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)

 

Nola

Nola is a short form of Finola, an Anglicized form of Fionnuala meaning “white shoulder” from Irish elements fionn (white, fair) and guala (shoulder). It could also be a nickname for Magnolia, a flower named after French botanist Pierre Magnol; the closest I could find about the name is that it might possibly be a diminutive of given name Magnus, a Latin name meaning “great”.

Nola could also be a feminine form of Nolan, itself derived from Irish surname Ó Nualláin meaning “descendant of Nuallán”, Nuallán meaning “noble, famous”.

Nola is also a town in Campania, Italy, and one that seems to have a long history. It was fought over for control by Hannibal and the Romans three times when the former invaded Italy and failed. I couldn’t find what the etymology behind the name is but it might have derived its name from Latin nola meaning “bell” since the first use of bells for Church services began there.

Origin: Irish, Latin

Variants:

  • Nuala (Irish)
  • Nolene (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Nolan (English, Irish)

 

Roberto

Roberto is the Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Robert, an English name derived from Germanic Hrodebert meaning “bright fame” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and beraht (bright).

Nicknames are Berto, Rob, or Robbie/Robby

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Robert (English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic)
  • Róbert (Hungarian, Icelandic)
  • Roibeárd (Irish)
  • Roopertti (Finnish)
  • Roberts (Latvian)
  • Robertas (Lithuanian)
  • Raibeart (Scottish)
  • Rupert (English, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Ruperto (Spanish)
  • Robrecht (Dutch)
  • Roparzh (Breton)
  • Robin
  • Robyn

 

Female forms:

  • Roberta
  • Robertina (Italian, Spanish)
  • Robin
  • Robyn
  • Robina
  • Robinia
  • Ruperta (Spanish)

 

Rudy

Rudy is a dimiutive of Rudolf or its feminine form Rudolfa, which comes from Germanic Hrodulf meaning “famous wolf” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and wulf (wolf).

Origin: Germanic

Male variants:

  • Rudi (German, Hungarian)
  • Rudolf (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian)
  • Rudolph (English)
  • Rodolph (English, French)
  • Rodolfo (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Rolf (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English)
  • Rolph (English)
  • Roul (Norman French)

 

Female forms:

  • Rudolfa
  • Rudolpha (English)

 

 

Claire

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Claire is the French feminine form of Clara, the feminine form of Clarusa Latin name meaning “clear, bright, famous”.

Variants:

  • Clara (Italian, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman)
  • Klara (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian)
  • Klára (Hungarian, Czech, Slovak)
  • Klāra (Latvian)
  • Chiara (Italian)
  • Clare (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Clair (French)
  • Clarus (Late Roman)

 

Roland

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: a name that is composed from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land) meaning “famous land”.

As well as being a given name, Roland is also a surname.

The Song of Roland (Fr: La Chanson de Roland) is a medieval French epic poem about Charlemagne’s fighting the Muslims in Spain during the Middle Ages.

Variants:

  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)
  • Orlando (Italian)
  • Rolando (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Rolande (French)
  • Rolanda (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Orlanda (Italian)