Arrosa

Arrosa is a Basque female name, the Basque form of Rose, the name of a flower which derives from Latin rosa meaning “rose” via Greek rhodon (rose) which may ultimately be derived from Persian *wrda- (rose), though it may also derive from Proto-Indo-European *wṛdho- meaning “sweetbriar”. Arrosa also means "pink" in Basque. Rose was also originally the Norman form of Germanic names beginning …

Niraj

Niraj is an Indian male name meaning "water-born" composed of nīrá नीर (water) derived from Proto-Dravidian *nīr (water), and já (born), which could be used in reference to a lotus flower since they grow in water. Origin: Proto-Dravidian, Proto-Indo-European Variants: Neeraj (Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati) Niraja (Indian, Hindi)  

Ratree

Ratree is a Thai female name which refers to type of night-blooming jasmine flower, as well as a word meaning "night, evening". Ratree is also a variant transcription of Ratri, which is also an Indian and Indonesian female name and the name of a Hindu goddess of the night. The name means "night, nighttime, evening" via …

Lilibeth

Lilibeth is an English female name which originated as a pet-name for Elizabeth, the English form of Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”. It seems to be especially popular in Venezuela. Lilibeth could also be a combination of Lily (the name of a flower which comes from Latin lilia, the plural of lilium derived from Ancient …

Anthea

Anthea is an Ancient Greek female, the Latinized spelling of Antheia meaning "blossom, bloom" from anthos (bloom, blossom) via a PIE root word. Anthea was also used as an epithet of the goddesses Hera and Aphrodite, as well as the name of one of the Graces (Charites). Antheia is also the name of several places in Greece and Bulgaria. Nicknames: Anthy, …

Mariposa

Mariposa comes from a Spanish and Portuguese word meaning "butterfly" and is the name of several places in the U.S., Canada, and Peru. I don't believe it's used as an actual name in Spanish-speaking countries. Mariposa is also the name of several lily-like plants in the genus Calochortus found in the western U.S. and Mexico, which received …

Viscaria

Viscaria is the name of a genus of flowers. There wasn't much I could find behind the name though I've seen it listed as meaning "sticky", which seems to refer to a sticky substance under the stem. The origin of the word seems to come from Latin viscum meaning "birdlime", which refers to a sticky substance that is …

Lobelia

Lobelia is the name of a genus of flowers named after Belgian botanist Matthias de Lobel (or Mathias de l'Obel). I couldn't find the meaning behind the surname Lobel/L'Obel, but it seems to have originated as a locational name based on the de- prefix; it's likely the name has a French (or perhaps Dutch) origin.      

Hadley

Hadley comes from an English surname, originating as a locational name for someone who came from a place called Hadley. It's made up of Old English elements hæð (heath) and lēah (wood, woodland, clearing, meadow) essentially meaning "heather field" or "field of heather", referring to a place where there was a lot of heather. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: …

Celandine

Celandine is the name of a species of flower, one known as the greater Celandine (Cheladonium majus) and lesser celandine (Ficaria verna). The name comes from Latin chelidonia (Celandine, swallowwort) via chelidonius (of or pertaining to a swallow) which comes from Ancient Greek khelidon (swallow), which may be derived from a PIE root word or perhaps from a …

Plumeria

Plumeria is the name of a genus of flowering plants, also known as frangipani. It was named after French botanist Charles Plumier. The origin of the surname is uncertain though it could be related to French plume meaning "feather; quill" via Latin pluma (feather, plume) derived from a PIE root word. It may have originated as an occupational …

Dahlia

Dahlia is the name of a genus of flowers native to Mexico, named after Swedish botanist Anders Dahl; Dahl is a Scandinavian surname which comes from Old Norse dalr meaning "valley" which derives from a PIE root word. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Dalia (Spanish) Dalya (Hebrew)