Jesse

Jesse comes from a Hebrew male name possibly meaning “gifted” or “Yahweh exists”. Jesse is also a surname originating from the given name. Although traditionally a male name, it has had occasional use as a female name, likely as a variant of Jessie, which is a nickname for Jessica meaning “to behold”, “foresight” or “one who looks forth”. Nicknames:…

Prudence

Prudence is a female given name, the medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of Prudentius, a Late Roman name which comes from Latin prudens meaning “wise, prudent”, a contracted form of providere (to see ahead, to forsee, provide) derived from a PIE root word. As an English word it refers to someone who shows good judgment or someone who…

Jessica

Jessica first appeared as a name in William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (1596) likely basing it on an existing name, Iscah (which would have been known as Jescha in his time) derived from Hebrew Yiskah meaning “to behold”, “foresight” or “one who looks forth”. Nicknames: Jess, Jessie/Jessy/Jessi/Jessye Origin: Hebrew Variants: Jessika (German, English) Gessica (Italian) Yessica…

Prudent

Prudent is the French masculine form of Prudentius, a Late Latin name derived from Latin providere meaning “to see ahead, to forsee, provide” derived from a PIE root word. As an English word it refers to someone who shows good judgment or someone who is wise or discreet, and has good sense. Nicknames: Prue/Pru Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Prudentius…

Deirdre

Deirdre is the name of a tragic heroine in Irish legend, which is why she’s known as Deirdre of the Sorrows. Before she was born her beauty was foretold by a druid, a beauty that would only bring strife and sorrow as kings and lords would go to war over her. King Conchobhar (Connor) decided to…

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning “provisions, supplies” from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess