Libelle

Libelle is the German and Dutch word for “dragonfly” as well as the French word (spelled libellé) meaning “wording”; it was used to refer to a type of political pamphlet or book in which it attacked important figures using slander, whether they were real or not, which is where the English word libel comes form. Libelle derive from Latin libellus, a diminutive of liber (book) so essentially meaning “little book”.

Origin: German, Dutch, Latin

 

Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning “moist, tender, delicate” or “calling”, as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning “hope”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic

Variants:

  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadja (German, Slovene)
  • Nadiyya (Arabic)
  • Nadiye (Turkish)
  • Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)

 

نديّة (Arabic) “moist, tender, delicate”

نادية (Arabic) “calling”

 

Hermes

Hermes is the name of the Greek god of commerce and trade, known as the trickster god and the protector of thieves, travelers, and athletes, as well as a messenger of the gods and the god of boundaries. He guided the souls of the dead to the underworld. The son of Zeus and Maia, one of the Pleiades, the day after his birth when he was just an infant, Hermes stole his half-brother Apollo’s cattle. When Apollo tracked him down, Hermes gave him a lyre he had just invented from the shell of a tortoise as an apology. He is the father of Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, and the great-grandfather of the hero Odysseus. Although the etymology of the name has been linked to Greek herma meaning “cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker” it could also be related to Proto-European *ser “to bind, put together”; or it could be related to an older word of non-European origin.

Hermes is also a surname, either derived from the name of the Greek god or it could be a Germanic matronynic surname from the given name Ermens, a short form of either Ermelendis (derived from Germanic elements ermen “whole, universal” and linde “soft, tender”) or Ermgart (likely a short form of Ermengarde, also a Germanic name from Germanic ermen “whole, universal” and garde “enclosure”). As a French surname, it could have arisen as a topographic name for someone who lived in a deserted spot or a patch of barren land from Greek eremia “desert, desolate, lonely uninhabited” and the local suffix –ès.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-European, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hermès (French)
  • Ermes (Italian)
  • Ermete (Italian)
  • Ermis (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Hermione (Ancient Greek)
  • Hermia (English)

 

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)

 

Melanie

Melanie is the English form of Mélanie, the French form of Latin Melania derived from Ancient Greek melas meaning “black, dark”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Mélanie (French)
  • Melany (English)
  • Mellony (English)
  • Mellanie (English)
  • Melánie (Czech)
  • Melaina (Greek)
  • Melánia (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Melania (Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman)
  • Melanija (Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian, Lithuanian)
  • Melani (Croatian, Slovene, Modern Greek, English)

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Sidonie

Sidonie is the French form of Sidonia, the feminine form of Sidonius, a Latin name meaning “of Sidon”, referring to someone from the ancient Phoenician city of Sidon (in what is now modern day Saïda, Lebanon). Sidon itself most likely comes from Phoenician Tzidhon meaning “fishing place” or “fishery” from tzud (to hunt, capture).

Origin: Phoenician

Variants:

  • Sidony (English)
  • Sidonia (German, Late Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Sidonius (Late Roman)