Melanie

Melanie is the English form of Mélanie, the French form of Latin Melania derived from Ancient Greek melas meaning “black, dark”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Mélanie (French)
  • Melany (English)
  • Mellony (English)
  • Mellanie (English)
  • Melánie (Czech)
  • Melaina (Greek)
  • Melánia (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Melania (Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman)
  • Melanija (Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian, Lithuanian)
  • Melani (Croatian, Slovene, Modern Greek, English)

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Sidonie

Sidonie is the French form of Sidonia, the feminine form of Sidonius, a Latin name meaning “of Sidon”, referring to someone from the ancient Phoenician city of Sidon (in what is now modern day Saïda, Lebanon). Sidon itself most likely comes from Phoenician Tzidhon meaning “fishing place” or “fishery” from tzud (to hunt, capture).

Origin: Phoenician

Variants:

  • Sidony (English)
  • Sidonia (German, Late Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Sidonius (Late Roman)

Janelle

Janelle is a variant form of Jane, the medieval English form of Old French Jehannethe feminine form of Johannes or Iohannes, which comes from the Hebrew name Yochanan  meaning “Yahweh is gracious”. Janelle is also a surname, an altered spelling of Janel, a French pet form of Jean which is the French form of John.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Janel (English)
  • Janella (English)
  • Janell (English)

 

Raphael

Raphael comes from Hebrew Rafa’el meaning “God has healed”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Raph/Raf

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Rafael (Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Rafinha (Portuguese diminutive of Rafael)
  • Rafa (Spanish diminutive of Rafael)
  • Raffael (German)
  • Raphaël (French)
  • Rafa’el (Hebrew)
  • Rafaël (Dutch)
  • Raffaele (Italian)
  • Raffaello (Italian)
  • Rafał (Polish)

 

Female forms:

  • Raphaela (German, English)
  • Raffaela (German)
  • Rafaela (Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian)
  • Raphaëlle (French)
  • Raffaella (Italian)
  • Raffaëla (Dutch)

 

Jade

Jade is the name of a semi-precious stone. The name comes from French l’ejade via Spanish piedra de la ijada which means “stone of the colic” because it was believed that it could cure pains in the side. The name itself comes from Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ileus (flank or severe colic). Jade is also a surname originating from the given name.

Jade symbolizes bravery, purity, wisdom, loyalty, justice, sincerity, and truth, and used as an emperiel gem by Chinese emperors in the past.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Jayde (English)
  • Jada (English)
  • Jayda (English)
  • Jaida (English)
  • Giada (Italian)

 

Juliet

Juliet is the English form of either Juliette, a French diminutive of Julie, or Giulietta, the Italian diminutive of Giulia. Both names are ultimately derived from Julia, the feminine form of Julius, an Ancient Roman name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Greek ioulos (downy-bearded) or it could be related to Jupiter, the name of the Roman god derived from Indo-European *Dyeu-Pater meaning “Zeus father”, Zeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Shakespeare used the name twice, the first for Romeo and Juliet (1591-1595) and Measure for Measure (1603-1604).

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Juliette (French, English)
  • Julietta (English, Polish)
  • Juliett (English)
  • Giulietta (Italian)
  • Giulia (Italian)
  • Julia (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Julie (French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, English)
  • Júlia (Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Yuliya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Ghjulia (Corsican)
  • Julija (Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian)
  • Julitta
  • Juli (Hungarian)
  • Iúile (Irish)
  • Jūlija (Latvian)
  • Julita (Polish)
  • Iulia (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Yulia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Yuliana (Russian, Bulgarian, Indonesian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Juliane (French, German)

 

Male forms:

  • Julius (Ancient Roman, English, German)
  • Julian (English, Polish, German)
  • Julyan (English)
  • Jolyan (English)
  • Iulius (Ancient Roman)
  • Iulian (Romanian)
  • Jules (French)
  • Giulio (Italian)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Julián (Spanish)
  • Julio (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Yuliy (Russian)
  • Juliusz (Polish)
  • Yulian (Russian, Bulgarian)

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)