Gwenllian

Gwenllian is a Welsh female name made up from Welsh elements gwen (white, fair, blessed) and llian (flaxen) so the name means "white flaxen" or "fair flaxen", perhaps originally used to refer to someone who was fair-haired, since flaxen was originally used to refer to someone who had blond hair. In Welsh, the double ll is pronoucned like a shl so the … Continue reading Gwenllian

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Georgette

Georgette is the French feminine form of George which is the English form of Greek Georgios, which means “farmer, earthworker” from georgos made up from Greek elements ge (earth) and ergon (work). Nicknames: George, Georgie, Ettie Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Georgia (English, Greek) Georgiana (English, Romanian) Georgina (English, Dutch, German, Spanish) Georgeanna (English) Georgine (English) Georgene (English) Georgine (French) Jorja (English) Gergana (Bulgarian) Đurađa … Continue reading Georgette

Gemma

Gemma originally derived as an Italian nickname meaning "gem, gemstone, jewel". It comes from Latin gemma (jewel; bud on a plant) which is either derived from Proto-Indo-European *gembh- (tooth, nail) or Proto-Indo-European *gen- (to produce). Gemma is also an Italian surname originating from the given name. Gemma is used as a term in botany to refer to a … Continue reading Gemma

Guinevere

Guinevere is the wife of King Arthur who was in love with Lancelot and whose affair led to her husband's downfall. Guinevere is the Norman French form of Gwenhwyfar, made up of Proto-Celtic *windos (fair, white, blessed) and sebara (specter, phantom, demon, spirit, magical being), so the name essentially means "fair phantom", "white phantom" or "white magical being". Nicknames: … Continue reading Guinevere

Ginger

Ginger is name of a flower and spice which comes from Old English gingifer (influenced by Old French gingembre) derived from Latin zingiberi from Ancient Greek zingíberis from Prakrit (Middle Indic) singabera derived from Sanskrit srngaveram meaning "horn body" from srngram (horn) and vera (body), though it may also be derived from an Old Tamil word inchi-ver meaning "ginger root"; it may also be a nickname for Virginia, the feminine form of an Ancient … Continue reading Ginger

Gabrielle

Gabrielle is the French feminine form of Gabriel, which comes from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”. Nicknames: Gabby, Brielle Origin: Hebrew Variants: Gabriella (Hungarian, Italian, Swedish, English) Gabriela (Portuguese, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian) Gabrijela (Croatian) Gabriëlle (Dutch) Gabriele (German) Gabrielė (Lithuanian) Gavrila (Romanian)   Male forms: Gabriel … Continue reading Gabrielle

Gentiana

Gentiana is the name of a genus of flowering plants, as well as also being the strictly feminine form of Gentian, derived from the given name Gentius which seems to have gotten its name from an Illyrian king supposedly because he discovered the medicinal properties of the plant. Though the etymology is uncertain, it could be derived from … Continue reading Gentiana

Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning "song" from Sanskrit gītā (song). The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical dialogue about the righteousness of battle against friends and family (Arjuna is about to battle his own cousin).  Origin: Sanskrit Variants: Geet (Hindi, Urdu) … Continue reading Gita

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning "wind" of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning "bad, furious" in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning "to shout, charm away" or from Old English galan meaning "to sing, enchant, call" which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also … Continue reading Gale