Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Garrett

Garret is a given name as well as a surname, a form of either Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy); or Gerald, another Germanic name meaning “ruler of the spear” from ger (spear) and wald (ruler, power, leader).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Garet (English)
  • Garret (English)
  • Garett (English)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)
  • Gerald (English, German)

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Ganesh

Ganesh is a variant form of Ganesha, an Indian male name meaning “lord of the hordes” composed from Sanskrit gana (horde, multitude) and isha (lord, ruler). In Hindu mythology, Ganesh is the name of the Hindu god of good fortune, wisdom, and of gates and beginnings. He is depicted as having the head of an elephant and the body of a man.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Ganesha (Sanskrit)
  • Gaṇeśa (Sanskrit)
  • Ganesa
  • Ganapati
  • Vinayaka
  • Binayak

 

Gabriel

Gabriel is a male name, from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Gabe

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Female forms:

  • Gabrielle (French, English)
  • Gabriella (Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)
  • Gavriila (Russian)

 

Glenn

Glenn comes from a Scottish surname meaning “valley” from Gaelic gleann, originally used to refer to someone who lived near a valley.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Glen (English, Scottish)
  • Glyn (Welsh)
  • Glynn (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Glenna (English, Scottish)
  • Glenne (English)

 

Gaius

Gaius is a Roman given name though one of uncertain etymology. It could be derived from Latin gaudere meaning “to rejoice”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from Gaia, a feminine name meaning “earth” in Greek, or perhaps from an Etruscan source that has long since lost its meaning. Apparently it was a very common given name to the point that it became a generic term for a man, with Gaia being a generic term for a woman, as well as being used in marriage ceremonies- ex: “where you are Gaius, I am Gaia”.

Origin: Latin, Greek, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Caius (Ancient Roman)
  • Gaios (Ancient Greek)
  • Caio (Portugese)
  • Gaioz (Georgian)
  • Kajus (Lithuanian)

 

Female forms:

  • Gaia (Ancient Roman, Ancient Greek)
  • Caia (Ancient Roman)