Gavin

Gavin is a medieval form of Gawain, a name of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Welsh Gwalchgwyn meaning "white hawk" from Old Welsh elements gwalch (hawk) and gwyn (white). Another possible origin for the name is from Welsh Gwalchmei meaning  "hawk of May" from Old Welsh gwalch (hawk) and mei (May). The name may also be derived from an early Brittonic name, *Ualcos Magesos meaning "hawk of … Continue reading Gavin

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Gennaro

Gennaro is a male given name, the Italian form of Januarius, a Roman cognomen meaning "January" from Latin ianus meaning "archway, covered passageway" derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey- (to go). Januarius gets its name from the Roman god Janus, who was the god of doorways, transitions, and beginnings, depicted with two heads- one looking forward and the other backward, looking to the future and to … Continue reading Gennaro

Galvin

Galvin comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gealbháin meaning "descendant of Gealbhán", the latter a personal name meaning "bright white" from geal (bright) and ban (white) which may have originated for someone with blond hair or who had white or gray hair as they grew older; gealbhan is also the Irish word for "sparrow". Origin: Gaelic  

George

George is the English form of Greek Georgios, which means "farmer, earthworker" from georgos made up from Greek elements ge (earth) and ergon (work). George is also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Georgios (Ancient Greek, Greek) Georgius (Latinized Greek) Giorgos (Modern Greek) Yiorgos (Greek) Yorgos (Greek) Gjergj (Albanian) Gevorg (Armenian) Kevork (Armenian) Gorka (Basque) Georgi (Bulgarian) … Continue reading George

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for "sword" and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning "to break, beat". Although I don't believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy's name before, I think it … Continue reading Gladio

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning "son of the red-haired youth" or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning "son of the king's servant". Origin: Gaelic    

Gregory

Gregory is the English form of Latinized Greek form Gregorius deriving from Greek Gregorios meaning "watchful, vigilant, alert" from Greek gregoros. Gregory is also a surname deriving from the given name. Origin: Greek Variants: Gregorios (Greek) Gregorius (Latinized Greek) Gregor (German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene, English) Gregorio (Italian, Spanish) Grégoire (French) Grigor (Welsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Armenian) Gligor (Macedonian) Krikor (Armenian) Grgur … Continue reading Gregory

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning "wind" of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning "bad, furious" in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning "to shout, charm away" or from Old English galan meaning "to sing, enchant, call" which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also … Continue reading Gale

Garrett

Garret is a given name as well as a surname, a form of either Gerard meaning "brave spear" or "hardy spear" from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy); or Gerald, another Germanic name meaning "ruler of the spear" from ger (spear) and wald (ruler, power, leader). Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Garet (English) Garret (English) Garett (English) Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish) Gerald (English, … Continue reading Garrett