Connor

Connor is the anglicized form of Gaelic Conchobhar meaning "lover of hounds" from Old Irish con (dog, hound) which derives from Proto-Celtic *kū (dog; wolf) derived from PIE *ḱwṓ (dog); and cobar (desiring) also derived from a PIE root word. Connor is also a surname derived from the given name. In Irish myth, Conchobhar mac Nessa was a legendary king of Ulster who was responsible for … Continue reading Connor

Advertisements

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan

Hector

Hector is the name of the Trojan hero, the son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba, and the husband of Andromache. He was the most beloved warrior in Troy and considered noble, virtuous, and dutiful. Hector was killed by Achilles and his body dragged around by a chariot (though his body was preserved by Apollo … Continue reading Hector

Keegan

Keegan comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Mac Aodhagáin, meaning "son of Aodhagán", the latter a pet diminutive (or sort of nickname) for Aodh, a male given name meaning "fire" from Old Irish Áed deriving from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eydʰ- (to burn, kindle; fire). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Keagan (English) Kegan (English) Egan (English) Eagan (English)  

Knox

Knox comes from a Scottish surname meaning "hillock" or "round hill" from Old Irish cnoc (hill, round hill), a habitational surname referring to someone who lived near a hilltop. Origin: Old Irish