Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Cassia

Cassia is the female form of Cassius, an Ancient Roman family name possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning “empty, vain”. It also means “cinnamon” in Latin and Greek, deriving from Hebrew qetzi’ah (cassia, cinnamon) (where the names Keziah comes from) from root word qatsa meaning “to cut off, strip off bark”. The name is pronounced either kash-uh or kas-ee-uh.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Kassia (English, Greek)
  • Keziah
  • Kezia
  • Kassiani (Greek)
  • Cássia (Portuguese)

 

Male forms:

  • Cassius (Ancient Roman, English)
  • Kassius (English)

 

Magdalini

Magdalini is the Modern Greek form of Magdalene meaning “of Magdala”, Magdala derived from Hebrew migdal meaning “tower”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Magdalene (English, German)
  • Magdalena (English, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish)
  • Madelon (Dutch)

 

Zeus

Zeus is the main god in the Greek pantheon, the god of the sky and thunder, law and order, and oaths. According to mythology, he was the youngest son of the Titan Cronus and Rhea. Because his father was told that a son of his would overthrow him just as Cronus had overthrown his own father Uranus, Cronus would swallow every child Rhea bore, boy or girl. When Zeus was about to be born, Rhea devised a plan to save him by swaddling a bundle of blankets or clothes with rocks and switching it out with the baby Zeus whom she gave to some nymphs to take care of. When Zeus came of age, he somehow managed to make his father gorge out the children he had swallowed and together they banded together to fight against the Titans, ending in victory for the Olympians.

Zeus’s name comes from Indo-European *Dyeus likely meaning “shine” or “sky, heaven, god”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Male variants:

  • Zeno (Ancient Greek, Italian)
  • Zenon (Ancient Greek, Polish)
  • Zinon (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Zenais (Ancient Greek)
  • Zenaida (Late Greek)
  • Zénaïs (French)

 

Diego

Diego is a name of uncertain etymology, though it could possibly be a short form of Santiago, a Spanish name meaning “Saint Yago” from Spanish santo (saint) and Yago, an old Spanish form of James meaning “supplanter” or “holder of the heel”. During medieval times Diego was Latinized as Didacus, which is linked to Greek didache meaning “teaching” though whether Diego’s true origins lie there is unknown.

Diego is also a surname (also spelled de Diego).

Origin: Spanish

Variants:

  • Didacus (Medieval Spanish)
  • Dídac (Catalan)
  • Xanti (Basque)
  • Santiago (Spanish, Portuguese)