Xerxes

Xerxes (pr. zurk-seez) is the Greek form of Persian Khshayarsha meaning "ruler over heroes" or "ruler among kings" or even "hero among heroes". Origin: Old Persian Variants: Khshayarsha (Ancient Persian)  

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Hero

Hero is the name of a lover of Leander, a priestess of Aphrodite. They lived on opposite sides of the Hellespont and every night Leander would swim across to meet up with his lover, who would light a lamp at the top of the tower to help guide his way. One night he got caught … Continue reading Hero

Lykos

Lykos is an Ancient Greek male name meaning "wolf" from Greek lukos (wolf) derived from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos (wolf), making it a cognate of Latin lupus, Old English wulf, and Russian volk. Lykos is the name of several figures in Greek mythology. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Lycus (Latinized Greek)  

Elendora

Elendora seems to be a unique name. There wasn't much information I could find out about it, though if I had to take a guess it could be a combination of Eleanor and Dora;  Eleanor is the Od French form of Occitan Aliénor which could possibly mean "the other Aenor" derived from Latin alia meaning “another” derived Proto-Indo-European *h₂élyos (beyond, other) from the root … Continue reading Elendora

Barnaby

Barnaby is a Medieval English form of Barnabas, the Greek form of an Aramaic name of uncertain meaning though it could mean "son of the prophet" or perhaps "son of encouragement" or "son of consolation". It's also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Barney Origin: Aramaic Variants: Barnabas (English, German, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek) … Continue reading Barnaby

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning "spear" or "lance" from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of … Continue reading Corin

Cassia

Cassia is the female form of Cassius, an Ancient Roman family name possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". It also means "cinnamon" in Latin and Greek, deriving from Hebrew qetzi'ah (cassia, cinnamon) (where the names Keziah comes from) from root word qatsa meaning "to cut off, strip off bark". The name is pronounced either kash-uh or kas-ee-uh. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Kassia (English, … Continue reading Cassia

Magdalini

Magdalini is the Modern Greek form of Magdalene meaning "of Magdala", Magdala derived from Hebrew migdal meaning "tower". Origin: Hebrew Variants: Magdalene (English, German) Magdalena (English, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish) Madelon (Dutch)  

Diego

Diego is a name of uncertain etymology, though it could possibly be a short form of Santiago, a Spanish name meaning "Saint Yago" from Spanish santo (saint) and Yago, an old Spanish form of James meaning "supplanter" or "holder of the heel". During medieval times Diego was Latinized as Didacus, which is linked to Greek didache meaning "teaching" though whether … Continue reading Diego