Hero

Hero is the name of a lover of Leander, a priestess of Aphrodite. They lived on opposite sides of the Hellespont and every night Leander would swim across to meet up with his lover, who would light a lamp at the top of the tower to help guide his way. One night he got caught in a storm and drowned, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowns herself in her grief. Hero is also the name of a female character in Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (1598-99). Hero is also a male name, used as the Latinized form of Heron. Both names comes from Greek element heros meaning “hero, warrior” which comes from the Proto-Indo-European root word *ser (to watch over, protect). A hero is also a word used to refer to someone who is brave and noble, the principal character in a  novel, or referring to a mythological or legendary figure or a demigod.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Female forms:

  • Iro (Modern Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Heron (Ancient Greek)

 

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Hella

Hella is a variant form of Helga, the feminine form of Helge, a Scandinavian name meaning “holy, blessed” from Old Norse heilagr, as well as also being an American slang term meaning “very, extremely”, a contraction of the phrase hell of a.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Helga (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Helle (Danish)
  • Olga (Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian)
  • Olha (Ukrainian)
  • Helka (Finnish)
  • Aila (Finnish)
  • Áile (Sami)
  • Aili (Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Helge (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German)
  • Helgi (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Oleg (Russian)
  • Oleh (Ukrainian)

 

Hana

Hana is a multicultural name with a variety of meanings:

  • it is the Czech, Slovak, and Croatian form of Hannah, which comes from Hebrew Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • it’s also an Arabic female name meaning “bliss, happiness”;
  • Hana is also a Korean female name meaning “one”;
  • it’s also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as: “flower” () pr “flower; splendor” (), though there may be other meanings depending on the kanji used;
  • it also means “work” or “craft” in Hawaiian;
  • hana is also a word in Maori which means “to shine, glow, radiate, give out heat” as a verb and “flame, glow, warmth, heat, radiance” as a noun;
  • the name may also be derived from Albanian hënë meaning “moon”.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic, Korean, Japanese, Hawaiian, Maori, Albanian

Variants:

  • Hanaa (Arabic)
  • Hana’a (Arabic)
  • Hannah (English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Hanna
  • Ha-na (Korean)

 

하나 (Korean Hangul)

هناء (Arabic)

 

Heidi

Heidi is the German diminutive of Adelheid, which is the German and Dutch form of Adelaide meaning “noble kind” or “noble sort” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and  heid (kind, sort, type).

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Heidy (English, Spanish)
  • Heida (German)
  • Adelheid (German, Dutch)
  • Adelaide (French, English, Italian, Portuguese)
  • Adalheidis (Ancient Germanic)

 

Hill

Hill comes from an English surname with several possible meanings such as:

  • it may have derived from a topographical name for someone who lived near or on a hill; the name comes from Old English hyll borrowed from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock) which ultimately comes from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to rise, to be tall);
  • it may also have been used as a medieval given name, a shortened form of Hilary/Hillary, derived from Latin hilarius meaning “cheerful, merry, happy”;
  • it may also derive from any personal name beginning with the Germanic element hild meaning “battle” such as Hilda;

Origin:  Proto-Indo-European, Latin, Germanic

 

 

Hadiyyah

Hadiyyah is an Arabic female name with two possible meanings. It means “gift” as well as also being a variant spelling of Hadia, the feminine form of Hadi meaning “leader, guide”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Hadiyah
  • Hediiye (Turkish)
  • Hadia
  • Hadiya
  • Hadya
  • Hadiiye (Turkish)

 

Male forms:

  • Hadi

 

هدية (Arabic) “gift”

هادية (Arabic) “leader, guide”

 

Herodias

Herodias is the feminine form of Herod, a Greek name meaning “song of the hero” from Greek elements heros (hero, warrior) and oide (song, ode).

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Erodiade (Italian)
  • Aradia (Italian)
  • Hérodiade (French)
  • Heroda (English)
  • Herodia
  • Erodias
  • Irodiada (Romanian)
  • Herodiana (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Herod (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodes (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodion (Ancient Greek)
  • Rodion (Russian)
  • Rodya (Russian diminutive of Rodion)
  • Herodianus (Latin)

 

Haydn

Haydn comes from a German surname meaning “pagan” or “heathen” from German Heide, which also means “heath, heathland”. It’s also been used as a variant spelling of Hayden, derived from Old English elements heg (hay) and denu (valley) or dun (hill) meaning “hay valley” or “hay hill”.

Origin: Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Hayden (English)

 

Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).