Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Haru

Haru is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning “spring” 春 and is also used as a name element in names like Haruko, a female name meaning 春子 “spring child”; Haruna meaning 春菜 “spring vegetables, greens”, 春渚 “spring + beach, shore, strand”; or Haruka meaning 遥 “far off, distant”, 春香 “spring + fragrance”, 春花 “spring flower”, or 春佳 “spring + beautiful/good/excellent”, or other various meanings. Haru also means 陽 (sun) and 晴 (clear up, clear weather), though there are likely other meanings.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Haruko (f)
  • Haruna (f)
  • Haruka (u)

 

Hikaru

Hikaru is a Japanese unisex name meaning “light” with the kanji or “brightness” with the kanji. Because it’s a unisex name, some kanji characters are used specifically for females while others are used for males only. Some kanji characters used for females are: 光佳留 “light + beautiful, good, excellent + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 光流 “light + to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander”; 光海 “light + sea, ocean”; 光留 “light + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 妃夏瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + summer + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃華瑠 “a rulers wife, queen, empress + flower, splendor + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃香瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + fragrance, fragrant + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; while some kanji used for men are: 光琉 “light + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 太陽 “sun”; “clear”; and 流星 “to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander + star”; 弘明 “to spread, enlarge, expand, great + clear, tomorrow, bright”; and many more depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

Hestia

Hestia is the name of the Greek goddess of the hearth, home, family and domestic life, and the Greek counterpart to the Roman goddess Vesta. The name comes from Ancient Greek hestia meaning “hearth, home”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

 

 

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Harriet

Harriet is the English form of Henriette, the French diminutive of Henri, the French male form of Henry meaning “home ruler” composed from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, ruler).

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Harriette (English)
  • Harriett (English)
  • Harrietta (English)
  • Henrietta (English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch)
  • Henriette (French, English, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian)

 

Male forms:

  • Harry (English)
  • Henry (English)

 

Hera

Hera is the Greek goddess of marriage, childbirth, women and family. She is also the queen of the gods, the wife of Zeus. Apparently Zeus fell in love with her at first sight but she refused his first marriage proposal, but he refused to give up so easily. He turned himself into a cuckoo bird and pretended to be in trouble outside her window. Feeling pity for the small bird, Hera brought it inside and held it to her breast, and Zeus transformed back into himself, and she agreed to be his wife out of shame. Their marriage, though, was anything but a happy one according to all the myths. Zeus was a womanizer and fathered many children with many women to Hera’s intense jealousy, and she would often go after the poor women and their offspring with vengeance. Although the etymology behind the name is unclear, it has been associated with Greek heros “hero, warrior”; hora “time, season”; or haireo “to be chosen”.

Some symbols of Hera are the cuckoo bird, peacocks, pomegranates, the scepter and the diadem, as well as the cow, the apple tree, the willow, the fig, the myrrh, lily, and the orange tree.

Origin: Greek