Haydn

Haydn is a German surname meaning “pagan” or “heathen” from German Heide, which also means “heath, heathland”. It’s also been used as a variant spelling of Hayden, derived from Old English elements heg (hay) and denu (valley) or dun (hill) meaning “hay valley” or “hay hill”.

Origin: Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Hayden (English)

 

Heinz

Heinz is a diminutive of Heinrich though it can be used as a given name on its own, the German form of Henry meaning “home ruler” from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (ruler). Heinz is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Heinrich (German)
  • Henry (English)

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Haru

Haru is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning “spring” 春 and is also used as a name element in names like Haruko, a female name meaning 春子 “spring child”; Haruna meaning 春菜 “spring vegetables, greens”, 春渚 “spring + beach, shore, strand”; or Haruka meaning 遥 “far off, distant”, 春香 “spring + fragrance”, 春花 “spring flower”, or 春佳 “spring + beautiful/good/excellent”, or other various meanings. Haru also means 陽 (sun) and 晴 (clear up, clear weather), though there are likely other meanings.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Haruko (f)
  • Haruna (f)
  • Haruka (u)

 

Hikaru

Hikaru is a Japanese unisex name meaning “light” with the kanji or “brightness” with the kanji. Because it’s a unisex name, some kanji characters are used specifically for females while others are used for males only. Some kanji characters used for females are: 光佳留 “light + beautiful, good, excellent + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 光流 “light + to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander”; 光海 “light + sea, ocean”; 光留 “light + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 妃夏瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + summer + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃華瑠 “a rulers wife, queen, empress + flower, splendor + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃香瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + fragrance, fragrant + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; while some kanji used for men are: 光琉 “light + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 太陽 “sun”; “clear”; and 流星 “to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander + star”; 弘明 “to spread, enlarge, expand, great + clear, tomorrow, bright”; and many more depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

Hercules

Hercules is the Latinized spelling of Greek name Herakles meaning “glory of Hera” from Greek elements kleos (glory) and the name of the goddess Hera. It’s rather an ironic name for the son of Zeus and a mortal woman, Alcmene, considering Hera hated him as she hated all of Zeus’s illegitimate offspring, and drove him mad enough to kill his wife Megara and their children, in which Hercules had to perform the Twelve Labors for penance. Hercules also had a twin brother, Iphicles, though he’s the son of Alcmene’s husband Amphitryon, and a full mortal. Apparently the same night Zeus seduced Alcmene (disguised as her husband), Amphitryon came home later that same night and slept with his wife, resulting in the birth of twin sons by different fathers).

As the son of a god, Hercules had great strength and killed many monsters. He was also very sexually active with many women (fathering many children) and men, and was killed (by accident) by his third wife Deianeira who was tricked into soaking his shirt with the blood of the centaur Nessus who attempted to kidnap and rape her before being killed by Hercules; after his death he became a full god and joined the other gods on Mount Olympus, where he married Hebe, the goddess of youth the cupbearer of the gods, and they had sons Alexiares and Anicetus.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Herakles (Greek)
  • Heracles (Latinized spelling of Heracles)
  • Heraclius (Ancient Greek, Latinized spelling)
  • Herakleios (Ancient Greek)
  • Iraklis (Modern Greek)
  • Heraclio (Spanish)
  • Erekle (Georgian)
  • Irakli (Georgian)
  • Irakliy (Russian)
  • Hercule (French)
  • Ercole (Italian)
  • Ercwlff (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Heraclea
  • Heracleia
  • Heraclia
  • Iraklia (Modern Greek)

 

 

Harry

Harry is a medieval form of Henry which comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning “home ruler” from Germanic heim (home) and ric (power, ruler).

Harry could also be a short form for Harold, a modern form of Old English Hereweald meaning “army leader” or “army ruler” from Old English here (army) and weald (ruler, leader, power) which ultimately comes from Ancient Germanic.

As well as being a given name, Harry is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Henry (English)
  • Harold (English)
  • Hank
  • Hal

 

Harold

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: Harold is a modern form of Old English Hereweald meaning “army leader” or “army ruler” from Old English here (army) and weald (leader, ruler, power) which ultimately come from Ancient Germanic elements hari (army) and wald (leader, ruler, power).

As well as being a given name, Harold is also a surname derived from the same source.

Nicknames include: Harry or Hal.

Variants:

  • Hereweald (Old English)
  • Haraldr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Harald (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German)
  • Haraldur (Icelandic)
  • Chariovalda (Ancient Germanic)
  • Hariwald (Ancient Germanic)
  • Aroldo (Italian)
  • Haroldo (Portuguese, Spanish)