Horatio

Horatio is the English form of Horatius, an Ancient Roman family name that could possibly be derived from Latin hora meaning "hour, time, season", although it's more likely that the name is Etruscan in origin and its real meaning lost. Horatio is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, as well as also being a … Continue reading Horatio

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Haven

Haven comes from an English word referring to a harbor or port, or any place that is used as a refuge or shelter. Basically it connotes a sense of safety and shelter. The word comes from Old English hæfen meaning "inlet; harbor, port" derived from Proto-Germanic *habnō (harbor; haven) related to Proto-Germanic *habą meaning "sea" from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to seize; to grab). … Continue reading Haven

Hilary

Hilary is the English form of Hilarius and Hilaria, both an Ancient Roman name meaning "happy, cheerful" from Latin hilaris via Ancient Greek hilarós from hílaos (gracious, merciful; kind, mild, gentle) deriving from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Hilary was once a very popular male name before becoming more common for women in the 20th century. Hilary is also a surname originating from the given name. … Continue reading Hilary

Harisha

Harisha is an Indian male name meaning "lord of monkeys" made up from Sanskrit elements hari and isha (lord). In Sanskrit hari means "tawny, yellow, brown, green" which extends to animals of the same coloring such as a lion, horse, or monkey. It derives from a Proto-Indo-European source, *ǵʰelh₃- (to shine; to flourish; green, yellow). In Hindu mythology, Hari is another name for the gods Vishnu and Krishna. … Continue reading Harisha

Hamish

Hamish is an anglicized form of Sheumais, the vocative case of Seumas, itself the Scottish form of James, the English form of Late Latin Iacomus via Greek Iakobos, which comes from the Hebrew name Ya’aqov (English form Jacob) meaning “holder of the heel” or “supplanter”. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Seumas (Scots Gaelic) Sheumais (Scots Gaelic) James (English)  

Hollis

Hollis comes from an English surname, derived from a place name in reference to someone who lived near a place with holly trees. It comes from Old English holegn meaning "holly" which may possibly be derived from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to prick). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Hollys (English)  

Hector

Hector is the name of the Trojan hero, the son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba, and the husband of Andromache. He was the most beloved warrior in Troy and considered noble, virtuous, and dutiful. Hector was killed by Achilles and his body dragged around by a chariot (though his body was preserved by Apollo … Continue reading Hector

Harrison

Harrison is an English surname, originally a patrynomic name meaning "son of Harry", Harry being a medieval form of Henry meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (ruler, power). Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Harryson (English) Harry (English)  

Henry

Henry comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, rule). It's also a surname derived form the given name. Shakespeare wrote several historical plays about King Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI of England. Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Heimirich (Ancient Germanic) Heinrich (Ancient Germanic, German) Henricus (Dutch, Latinized Ancient Germanic) Henrik … Continue reading Henry

Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba'al meaning "grace of Ba'al", Ba'al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means "lord, husband". Hannibal … Continue reading Hannibal