Fiona

Fiona seems to have first been coined by Scottish poet James Macpherson who based it on the Fianna, the name of a group of warriors in Irish mythology, or as the feminine form of Fionn. The name comes from Old Irish finn meaning “fair, blond, white” from Proto-Celtic *windos- (white).

Origin: Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Fionna (English, Scottish)

 

Male forms:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finn (Irish, English)

 

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Galvin

Galvin comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gealbháin meaning “descendant of Gealbhán”, the latter a personal name meaning “bright white” from geal (bright) and ban (white) which may have originated for someone with blond hair or who had white or gray hair as they grew older; gealbhan is also the Irish word for “sparrow”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

Rufus

Rufus comes from an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “red, ruddy, red-haired”, originally a nickname for someone who had red hair. It comes from Latin rufus derived from the Proto-Indo-European root word *h₁rewdʰ- (red). Rufus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European.

Variants:

  • Rufinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufino (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rufius (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufio (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Rufina (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Russian)
  • Rufia (English)

 

Rogan

Rogan comes from an Irish surname, Ó Ruadhagáin, meaning “descendant of Ruadhagan”, Ruadhagan being a diminutive of ruadh meaning “red, redheaded”, which comes from Proto-Celtic *roudos (red) via Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ- (red).

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Locke

Locke comes from a surname of several origins and meanings such as:

  • an English, Dutch, and German surname derived from a place name called Lock, referring to someone who lived near an enclosure or a barrier on a river such as a bridge which could be open and closed at will;
  • it could also be an occupational surname used to refer to a locksmith or a lock-keeper from Old English loc meaning “fastening, lock”;
  • Locke could also have come about as a nickname for someone with curly hair from Old English locc via Proto-Germanic *luka (to bend; turn);
  • I’ve also seen it listed as a romanization of Lok, which is the Cantonese pronunciation of Chinese surname Luo meaning “white horse; camel” with the character 駱 or 骆;
  • it might also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname O’Lochlainn meaning “son of Lochlainn”, Lochlainn being the Irish form of Lachlan, originally a Scottish nickname used to refer to someone who was from Norway; Lochlainn means “land of the lochs”.

Locke also connotes the idea of closing or fastening something shut, as well as referring to a lock of hair.

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Chinese

Variants:

  • Lock (English)
  • Lokk (English)
  • Lok (Cantonese, English)

 

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Kelly

Kelly comes from a surname, an anglicized form of Ó Ceallaigh meaning “descendant of Ceallach”, Ceallach being an Irish given name of uncertain meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “bright-headed” or perhaps coming from Irish ceallach “war, strife, contention” or Irish ceall meaning “church”. Kelly could also be derived from Scottish Gaelic coille meaning “wooded area” and “grove, forest, woodland”.

Origin: Gaelic

Female forms:

  • Kelley
  • Kelli
  • Kellie
  • Kelleigh

 

Male forms:

  • Kelley
  • Ceallach (Irish)
  • Ceallagh (Irish)
  • Ceallachán (Irish)

 

Russ

Russ is a short form of Russell, an English male name which comes from a surname meaning “little red one” from Old French rousel. It was originally given as a nickname for someone who had red hair or a reddish complexion.

Russ is also an archaic word for Russian.

Origin: Old French

Variants:

  • Russell (English)
  • Russel (English)
  • Rusty (English)
  • Russett (English; unisex)

 

Kiera

Kiera is a variant spelling of Kira which is also another spelling of Ciara, the feminine form of Ciar, an Irish masculine name meaning “black”, referring to someone who had black hair or had a darker complexion.

Origin: Irish

Variants:

  • Kira
  • Ciara
  • Kiara
  • Kiarra
  • Keara
  • Kyra