Veruca

Veruca is a variant spelling of Verruca which comes from Latin meaning “wart” derived from Proto-Indo-European *wers- (wart; highland, steep place), making it a cognate of varus and varix. 

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Verruca (Latin)

 

Advertisements

Briana

Briana is the feminine form of Brian, an Irish name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Old Celtic element bre meaning “hill” which, by extension, also means “high, noble”.It could also be related to Celtic brig- or brigant- meaning “high”, briga- meaning “might” and “power”, or brigh- meaning “noble, strong, virtuous”. Briana is a character in The Faerie Queen, an epic poem written by English poet Edmund Spenser, an allegorical work celebrating the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. It was published between 1590 and 1596 though he died before he could finish the entirety of the poem.

Nicknames: Bri/Bree

Origin: Old Celtic

Variants:

  • Brianna
  • Bryana
  • Bryanna
  • Breanna
  • Brina
  • Bryna
  • Breann
  • Brianne
  • Breanne
  • Breeanne
  • Bryanne

 

Male forms:

  • Brian
  • Brion
  • Bryan
  • Bryon

 

Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Volterra

Volterra is the name of a town in Italy that goes back to the time of the Etruscans (who called it Velathri before the Roman conquered it and renamed it Volterrae, eventually becoming Volterra). The name is of Etruscan origin and the first part of the name, vel, might come from a root verb used to indicate height, such as a hill, and used in the names of families to indicate a high status. As a surname Volterra is used to describe someone who came from the town of Volterra.

Origin: Etruscan

Variants:

  • Velathri (Etruscan)

 

Arden

Arden is a place name and a surname that comes from Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. It was used as the name of a forest in William Shakespere’s play As You Like It (roughly around 1599), as well as being the name of a real forest in Warwickshire, England. Arden was also the maiden name of Shakespeare’s mother, Mary Arden.

Another possible meaning I’ve seen for Arden is “eagle valley” which comes from Old English earn (eagle) and dun (valley).

Arden is also a word in Spanish, the third person plural of arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere. 

Origin: Celtic, Old English, Latin