Fernald

Fernald comes from a French surname which seems to be a variant of Furnell, either a  topographic or occupational name meaning “furnace” in reference to someone who either worked as an iron-worker or lived near one. It’s also possible that Fernald is a variant spelling of Farnall, an English locational name meaning “fern hill” given to someone…

Terra

Terra is the Latin word for “earth, soil; dry land” and in Roman mythology Terra is the name of a goddess of earth which derives from a PIE root word *ters- (dry), and is also a word in Italian, Galician and Catalan derived from Latin. It’s also possible that Terra is a variant spelling of Tara, (which…

Eldon

Eldon comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “Ella’s hill” composed from given name Ella (the Norman form of Alia which comes from Germanic element alja meaning “other, another, foreign”) and dun meaning “hill”. I’ve also seen other meaning listed for it, coming from Old English ælf (elf) or elfitu (swan) and denu (valley) meaning “elf valley” or…

Ogden

Ogden comes from an English surname via a locational name meaning “oak valley” made up from Old English elements āc (oak) and denu (valley). Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Deandra

Deandra is an English female name, either a combination of Dean (an English male name with various meanings of “valley”, or “dean”, referring to a person who was a dean or someone who worked for one, referring to an ecclesialtical head of a cathedral. It’s derived from Latin decanus meaning “chief of ten” in reference to someone who was in…

Sheldon

Sheldon comes from an English surname, a locational name for someone who came from any place called Sheldon. It’s made up from Old English elements scylf (shelf) and either dun (hill) or denu (valley), so essentially meaning “steep-sided valley”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European  

Penn

Penn comes from an English surname, a habitational name for someone who came from a place called Penn, which seems to be derived from a Proto-Celtic source meaning “head; chief” though I’ve also seen it listed as possibly meaning “hill”. It could also be derived from an occupational name for someone who was either a…

Cameron

Cameron comes from a Scottish surname meaning “crooked nose” or “hook nose” from Gaelic elements cam (crooked) and sron (nose). It’s also a habitational surname from any place called Cambrun which seems to come from a different source, meaning “crooked hill” from Gaelic cam (crooked) and brun (hill). Nicknames: Cam, Cammy/Cammie Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Camron (English) Kameron (English) Kamron (English) Camren…

Tilden

Tilden comes from an English surname which seems likely to be derived from a habitational name. The second element comes from Old English denu meaning ‘”valley” while the first element seems to be derived from an Old English personal name, Tila, so the name means “Tila’s valley”. It’s possible that Tila comes from Middle English tilyen (to till, to cultivate or…