Annora

Annora is a medieval English spelling of Honora which is a variant spelling of Honoria, the feminine form of Honorius meaning “honor” from Latin honos.

Nicknames: Nora, Ann, Annie/Anny

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Honora (Irish, English)
  • Onóra (Irish)
  • Honoria (Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Honoré (French)
  • Honorius (Roman)

 

Zebulon

Zebulon is a name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Ugartic zbl meaning “prince”, linked to the same root word as Jezebel meaning “where is the prince?” or “not exalted”. Zebulon may originally have been used as an epithet for the god Ba’al. Other theories of the name link to Hebrew zabal meaning “to exalt, to honor”; zeved “gift, dowry”; or “dwelling”. Zebulon is the name of the youngest son of Jacob and Leah in the Bible and the Torah, as well as the founder of the Tribe of Zebulon.

Nicknames: Zeb

Origin: Ugartic, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Zebulun (Biblical)
  • Zaboulon (Biblical Greek)
  • Zevulun (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Zabulon (Biblical Latin)

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Lenora

Lenora is a short form of Elenora, a variant form of Eleanor which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Consort of France and England during the 12th century, is said to have been named after her mother Aenor, and Aliénor distinguished her as the other Aenor. However, since the name had been used well before Eleanor of Aquitaine’s birth, it seems likely that that particular meaning was only used for mother and daughter.

Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”

Origin: Germanic, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Elenora (English)
  • Eleanora (English)
  • Lenore (English)
  • Leanora (English)
  • Alienor (Occitan)
  • Aliénor (Occitan)
  • Alianor (French, English)
  • Alienora (Latin)

 

Titus

Titus comes from an Ancient Roman given name of unknown meaning though it has been linked to Latin titulus meaning “title of honor” or Latin titio “fire-brand”. It’s likely, however, that the name is pre-Roman in origin, possibly Sabine, and its true meaning lost to time. Titus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Sabine

Variants:

  • Tito (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Tiitus (Estonian, Finnish)
  • Titos (Biblical Greek)
  • Titas (Lithuanian)
  • Tytus (Polish)
  • Tit (Russian)
  • Titius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Titia (Ancient Roman, Dutch, German)
  • Tita (Ancient Roman)