Seamus

Seamus (pr. sha-mus) is an anglicized form of Séamus, the Irish form of James, an English male name derived from Late Latin Iacomus via Greek Iakobos, which comes from the Hebrew name Ya’aqov (English form of Jacob) meaning “holder of the heel” or “supplanter”.  Origin: Hebrew Variants: Séamus (Irish) Séamas (Irish) Shamus (Irish) Sheamus (Irish) Shaymus (English)  

Doyle

Doyle comes from an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall", Dubhgall (Dougal) meaning "dark stranger", composed of dubh (dark, black) and ghall (foreigner, stranger). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Dougal (Scottish, Irish) Dubhgall (Scottish Gaelic)  

Makenna

Makenna is a variant of McKenna, an anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cionaodha meaning "son of Cionaodh", Cionaodh meaning "beloved of Aodh" composed of Irish cion (love, affection; regard) and Aodh (also spelled Áed, the name of the Celtic god of fire) meaning "fire". It could also be a variant of Cináed meaning "born of fire", also anglicized as Kenneth.  Nicknames: Kenna Origin: Proto-Indo-European   …

Barrett

Barrett is an English and Irish surname with several possible origins: Barrett comes from an English surname which seems to have arisen as a nickname for a quarrelsome or deceitful person, which comes from Old English barat, barrette (trouble, trickery, deception, strife) via an Old French word referring to commerce such as bartering and haggling; it …

Callahan

Callahan comes from an Irish surname, an anglicized form of Irish Ó Ceallacháin meaning "descendant of Ceallachán", Ceallachán being a diminutive form of Ceallach, a name of uncertain meaning though it could mean "bright-headed" or it could be derived from ceallach (war, strife) or ceall (church). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kallahan (English) Ceallachán (Irish)  

Lugh

Lugh is the name of a hero in Irish mythology, the son of Cian and Eithne, though he's also been associated with Lugus, an early Celtic god associated with the god Mercury by the Romans. Lugh is portrayed as a skilled warrior and craftsman. The etymology behind the name is uncertain. It could be a variant of Lugus, which itself …

Cullen

Cullen comes from a surname with a few possible sources: from an Irish surname, an anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coileáin meaning "descendant of Coileán", Coileán meaning "pup, whelp, young dog"; it could also be an anglicized form of Ó Cuilinn meaning "descendant of Cuileann", Cuileann being an Irish and Scottish Gaelic word meaning "holly"; as an English surname it …

Fenella

Fenella is a female given name, the Scottish form of Fionnuala, made up from Irish elements finn (fair, white) and guala (shoulder) meaning “fair shoulder” or “fair-shouldered”. In Irish mythology, Fionnuala is the name of a figure in Irish mythology, the daughter of King Lir and the sister of Aodh, Fiachra, and Conn. She and her brothers were changed into swans by their stepmother Aoife, …

Finnian

Finnian is an Irish male name which comes from Irish element finn meaning "white, fair, blessed" via Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finnian is also a surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Finn Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Finnén (Irish) Fionn (Irish) Finn (Irish) Gwenneg (Breton) Winoc (Breton, French) Gwyn (Welsh) Gwynn (Welsh) Wyn (Welsh) Wynn (Welsh) Wynne (Welsh)   …

Breccan

Breccan is an anglicized form of Breccán, an Irish male name meaning "speckled, freckled", made up of Old Irish brecc (speckled, freckled) via Proto-Celtic *brikkos combined with diminutive suffix -an.   Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Breccán (Irish) Brychan (Welsh)    

Fiachra

Fiachra (pr. fee-akh-ra; Forvo) is the name of one of the children of Lir who, along with his brothers Aodh and Conn and sister Fionnuala, were turned into swans by their stepmother Aoife, a curse that lasted for 900 years before being broken. The name comes from Irish fiach meaning "raven" which derives from a Proto-Celtic root word. Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Fiacre (French) …

Lir

Lir is the Irish cognate of Llyr, the name of the Welsh god of the sea in Welsh mythology. The name means "sea" or "ocean". In Irish mythology, Lir is the Irish god of the sea and the father of Manannan mac Lir, also a sea deity. There's also an Irish legend called The Children of Lir, in …