Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Annetta

Annetta is a Latinate form of Anna, coming from Hebrew Hannah or Channah meaning “favor” or “grace”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Annette (French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch)
  • Annett (German)
  • Anna
  • Anne

 

Lisetta

Lisetta is an Italian diminutive of Elizabeth, which comes from Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Lysetta (English)
  • Lisette (French, English)
  • Lysette (English)
  • Lizette (English)

 

Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Rebecca

Rebecca is a variant spelling of Rebekah which comes from Hebrew Rivka which has been linked to Hebrew r-b-q meaning “to tie, to join, snare”, and has even been linked to an ensnaring or captivating beauty.

Nicknames: Becky, Becca/Beka, Bex, Beck, Reba

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Rebekah (English)
  • Rebekka (German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Finnish, Biblical Greek)
  • Rebeccah (English)
  • Rebeckah (English)
  • Rébecca (French)
  • Rebeka (Hungarian)
  • Rebeca (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rebecka (Swedish)
  • Rivka (Hebrew)
  • Riva (Hebrew diminutive of Rivka)
  • Rivqah (Hebrew)

 

Della

Della originally started out as a nickname for names like Adela, from Germanic element adal meaning “noble”, and Adelaide, the French form of Germanic Adalheidis meaning “noble character” or “noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type). Della is also an Italian word and surname meaning “of the”, originally used to refer to the place a person originally came from or the name of their father. It comes from Latin di + la.

Origin: Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Dela

 

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Adriano

Adriano is the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of Adrian, the English form of Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Adriano is also a Spanish and Italian surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Adrian (English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian)
  • Adrien (French)
  • Hadrianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadrian (Roman)
  • Adrià (Catalan)
  • Adrijan (Macedonian, Croatian)
  • Jadran (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Jadranko (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adriaan (Dutch)
  • Arjan (Dutch)
  • Adrianus (Dutch)
  • Adorján (Hungarian)
  • Adrián (Hungarian, Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Adriana (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianna (Polish, English)
  • Adriana (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianne (English)
  • Hadriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadria (Roman)
  • Adria (English)
  • Adrijana (Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Jadranka (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adrienne (French)
  • Adrienn (Hungarian)

 

Juliet

Juliet is the English form of either Juliette, a French diminutive of Julie, or Giulietta, the Italian diminutive of Giulia. Both names are ultimately derived from Julia, the feminine form of Julius, an Ancient Roman name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Greek ioulos (downy-bearded) or it could be related to Jupiter, the name of the Roman god derived from Indo-European *Dyeu-Pater meaning “Zeus father”, Zeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Shakespeare used the name twice, the first for Romeo and Juliet (1591-1595) and Measure for Measure (1603-1604).

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Juliette (French, English)
  • Julietta (English, Polish)
  • Juliett (English)
  • Giulietta (Italian)
  • Giulia (Italian)
  • Julia (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Julie (French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, English)
  • Júlia (Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Yuliya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Ghjulia (Corsican)
  • Julija (Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian)
  • Julitta
  • Juli (Hungarian)
  • Iúile (Irish)
  • Jūlija (Latvian)
  • Julita (Polish)
  • Iulia (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Yulia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Yuliana (Russian, Bulgarian, Indonesian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Juliane (French, German)

 

Male forms:

  • Julius (Ancient Roman, English, German)
  • Julian (English, Polish, German)
  • Julyan (English)
  • Jolyan (English)
  • Iulius (Ancient Roman)
  • Iulian (Romanian)
  • Jules (French)
  • Giulio (Italian)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Julián (Spanish)
  • Julio (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Yuliy (Russian)
  • Juliusz (Polish)
  • Yulian (Russian, Bulgarian)

 

Gilda

Gilda comes from Germanic element gild meaning “sacrifice, value”, originally a nickname for Ermenegilda, the Italian feminine form of Ermenegildo, itself the Italian form of Spanish and Portuguese name Hermenegildo which comes from a Visigothic name meaning “complete sacrifice” or “whole sacrifice” from Germanic elements ermen (whole, universal) and gild (sacrifice, value).

Gilda could also be from Old English gyldan meaning “to gild, to cover with a thin layer of gold” which comes from Proto-Germanic *gulthjan and gulþą (gold).

Gilda could also be the feminine form of Gildas, the Latinized form of a Celtic name. Though the etymology isn’t certain, it might be derived from Celtic elements *kCElyo (companion) + *dCEwo (a God) meaning “companion of God” or “servant of God”.

Origin: Germanic, Celtic

Male forms:

  • Gild
  • Gildas (Brythonic)