Romeo

Romeo is the Italian form of Late Latin Romaeus which comes from Greek rhomaios meaning “Roman”, used in reference to a pilgrim traveling to Rome or someone who was a former citizen of Rome. Probably the most famous bearer of this name is Romeo Montague from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. It’s also a surname that originally referred to someone who came from Rome or who had made a pilgramage to Rome.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Romaeus (Late Latin)
  • Romanus (Late Latin)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian)
  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Roma (Russian diminutive of Roman)
  • Romain (French)
  • Román (Spanish, Hungarian)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Romão (Portuguese)
  • Romulus (Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian)
  • Romaine (French)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning “moist, tender, delicate” or “calling”, as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning “hope”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic

Variants:

  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadja (German, Slovene)
  • Nadiyya (Arabic)
  • Nadiye (Turkish)
  • Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)

 

نديّة (Arabic) “moist, tender, delicate”

نادية (Arabic) “calling”

 

Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)

 

Lavinia

Lavinia is the name of the second wife of Aeneas in Roman mythology, the daughter of King Latinus and the namesake of the town Lavinium though it might be the other way around, that she derived her name from the town. The etymology behind the name is unknown, most likely an Etruscan name whose meaning was lost to time. In Titus Andronicus (1588-1593) Lavinia is the daughter of Titus Andronicus who is raped, has her tongue and hands cut off, and is later killed by her father.

Origin: Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Lavínia (Portuguese, Catalan)

 

Sabrina

Sabrina is the Latin form of Old Welsh Habren or Hafren, the original name of the River Severen in the United Kingdom. The name might be derived from Proto-Celtic *samaros meaning “summer fallow, fallow land” from Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) and *aros (ploughing, ploughed land), or from *samos (summer) and *renwo- (quick, fast) or it could possibly mean “boundary” from an unknown source. Sabrina could also be an Arabic name derived from Arabicصبر (sabr) meaning “patient”. 

According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, the river received its name from the daughter of Locrinus, a king of the Britons, and his mistress Estrildis, a captured Germanic princess who was originally brought to Britain as a captive by the Huns. Locrinus fell in love with her but he was already bethrothed to Gwendolen, the daughter of Corineus and an ally of his father’s, and though he went through with the marriage and had a son by her, Locrinus kept Estrildis a secret by locking her in a cave underground and visiting her there. He had his daughter by her. When Corineus died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and took Estrildis as his queen. In response, Gwendolen assembled an army during which he was killed in battle, and Gwendolen had Estrildis and Sabrina/Habren drowned in the river which now bears her name.

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Arabic

Variants:

  • Sabryna (English)
  • Zabrina (English)
  • Habren (Welsh)
  • Hafren (Welsh)
  • Severn (English)
  • Sabre
  • Sabren
  • Averne

 

Claudia

Claudia is the feminine form of Claudius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “lame, crippled” from Latin claudus. 

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Klaudia (Polish, Slovak)
  • Klavdiya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Klaudija (Croatian)
  • Claudette (French, English)
  • Claudine (French, English)
  • Cláudia (Portuguese)
  • Klavdija (Slovene)
  • Gladys (Welsh, English)
  • Claude (French, English)
  • Claudie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Claudius (Ancient Roman)
  • Claudio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Cláudio (Portuguese)
  • Klaudio (Croatian)
  • Klaudijs (Latvian)
  • Klaudiusz (Polish)
  • Claudiu (Romanian)
  • Claud (English)
  • Claude (French)

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Annetta

Annetta is a Latinate form of Anna, coming from Hebrew Hannah or Channah meaning “favor” or “grace”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Annette (French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch)
  • Annett (German)
  • Anna
  • Anne

 

Lisetta

Lisetta is an Italian diminutive of Elizabeth, which comes from Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Lysetta (English)
  • Lisette (French, English)
  • Lysette (English)
  • Lizette (English)