Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Jerome

Jerome is the English form of Hieronymus, a Greek male name meaning “sacred name” from Greek hieros (sacred) and onuma (name).

Nicknames: Jerry

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Hieronymos (Ancient Greek)
  • Hieronymus (Ancient Greek, Dutch, German)
  • Jeronim (Croatian, Albanian)
  • Geronim (English)
  • Gérôme (French)
  • Jeroen (Dutch)
  • Jérôme (French)
  • Geronimo (English, Spanish)
  • Gerónimo (Spanish)
  • Jerónimo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Jerônimo (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Ieronimus (Medieval Latin)
  • Gerolamo (Italian)
  • Girolamo (Italian)
  • Geronimus (Latin)
  • Jeronimus (Latin)

 

Jaime

Jaime is a variant spelling of Jamie, a nickname for James which is the English form of Late Latin Iacomus via Greek Iakobos, which comes from the Hebrew name Ya’aqov (English form Jacob) meaning “holder of the heel” or “supplanter”. Jaime is also the Spanish and Portuguese male form of James though it’s pronounced hie-mee.

Origin: Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Jamie (Scottish, English)
  • Jaymee (English)
  • Jayme (English)
  • Jaimie (English)
  • Jami (English)
  • Jayma (English)

 

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)

 

June

June is the sixth month of the year according to the Julian calendar. The name derives from the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and goddess of marriage and women; Hera is her Greek counterpart. Her name is possibly related to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful” from Proto-Indo-European *yeu- meaning “vital force”, related to her role as a goddess of childbirth.

June may also be related to Latin iuniores meaning “the younger ones”.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Junie
  • Juno
  • Junia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Junius (Ancient Roman)

 

Jared

Jared is the English form of Hebrew name Yared or Yered meaning “descent”, so named because in his time angels descended from Heaven down to earth. Jared could also be related to a root word meaning “to rule, command” and I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “rose”, although I don’t know how accurate that last part is. Jared is also a surname though it doesn’t come from Hebrew but from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Gerard”, Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy);

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Jarod (English)
  • Jarrod (English)
  • Jarred (English)
  • Jerrod (English)
  • Jerred (English)
  • Jered (English)
  • Iared (Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin)
  • Yared (Hebrew, Ethiopian)
  • Yered (Hebrew)

 

Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)

Jun

Jun is a Japanese unisex name with various meanings of: 純 “innocent, pure, genuine”, 潤 “moisture”, 淳 “pure”, 順 “order, obey”, 準 “conform, imitate, semi-“, 洵 “alike, truth”, 隼 “falcon”, and likely other meanings depending on the kanji used. It can also be used with other name elements such as Junko, a female name, or Junki, a male name.

Origin: Japanese

 

Johann

Johann (pr. yo-hahn) is the German form of John, the English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of Greek Ioannes from Hebrew Yochanan meaning “Yahweh is gracious”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • John (English)
  • Johannes (German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latin)
  • Johan (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch)

 

Female forms:

  • Johanna (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, Roman)
  • Johanne (French, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French)
  • Jana (German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Catalan)
  • Janina (German, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Lithuanian)