Jahking

Jahking is the name of a young American actor, Jahking Guillory, and as far as I can tell he's the only one with this name. Apparently the name was created by his father, made up of Jah, a shortened form of Yahweh, the name of the Hebrew god in Judaism (and part of Biblical names such as Isaiah, …

Valery

Valery is a Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian male name, a variant transcription of Valeriy which comes from Valerius, an Ancient Roman cognomen derived from Latin valere meaning “to be healthy, strong” via PIE *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). Spelled Valéry, it's a French male name which in this case seems to derive from an Ancient Germanic name, Walaric, Walherich; the second element of the name comes from …

Balthazar

Balthazar is a variant form of Belshazzar, a Babylonian male name meaning "may Bel protect the king" or "may Bel safeguard the king", Bel being a variant of Baal, a Canaanite god who was the chief god in Phoenician mythology and all across Mesopotamia; Baal was also used as an epithet for other gods in Near East mythology; the name …

Regis

Regis comes from French Régis, which comes from a surname meaning "of the king" or "ruler" from French régir (to govern) via a PIE root word; it originated as an occupational name for someone who worked in the king's household. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Régis (French)  

Kinsey

Kinsey comes from an English surname which comes from a Middle English given name, Kynsey, which comes from Old English Cynesige meaning "royal victory", made up from Old English elements cyne (royal, kingly) and sige (victory, success). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kynsey (English, Middle English)   Male forms: Kynsey (English, Middle English) Cynesige (Old English)  

Kenric

Kenric is a variant spelling of Kendrick, a surname with various possible sources and meanings: as an English surname it comes from Old English given name Cyneric or Cenric meaning "bold power" or "royal power" made up from Old English elements cyne (royals kingly) and ric (ruler, power, king); as a Welsh surname it derives from Welsh Cynwrig meaning "chief hero" or …

Uther

Uther is the name of the father of King Arthur in Arthurian legend. While the name is of uncertain meaning, it's been linked to Welsh uthr meaning "terrible" though it's also possible it may be a variant of Arthur meaning "bear king". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Uthyr (Welsh)  

Tudor

Tudor is the name of an English royal house as well as the name of a historical era (1485-603), named from the House of Tudor. The name comes from Welsh Tudur which seems to be derived from Proto-Celtic Toutorix meaning "ruler of the people" or "ruler/king of the tribe", composed of Proto-Celtic elements *toutā (people, tribe) and *rīxs (king); making it …

Melchior

Melchior is the name given to one of three Magi who visited the newborn Jesus Christ. It means "king of light", made up from Hebrew melech (king) and or (light). Melchior is also a surname originating from the given name. Origin: Proto-Semitic Variants: Melchiorre (Italian) Melchor (Spanish) Melker (Swedish)   Female forms: Melchiora (Italian) Melchiorra (Italian) Melchiorina (Italian) …

Khosrow

Khosrow is the name of several kings of Persia, including Khosrow II, who is featured in Ferdowsi's Shahnameh (meaning Book of Kings, an epic long poem about the mythical history of the Persian empire), as well as an epic poem titled Khosrow and Shirin (also known as Shirin and Farhad); while the Shahnameh focused on the battles of Khosrow, the …

Basilio

Basilio is the Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of Basil, the English form of Latin Basilius via Ancient Greek Basileios/Basileus meaning “king, kingly”. It comes from Proto-Hellenic *gʷatiléus (chief; king) which seems to be derived from a pre-Greek origin, perhaps from Lydian battos (king). The plant basil, used in cooking, gets its name from the source above. Basilio is also a surname originating …

Elroy

Elroy is an English male name, either a variant form or an altered spelling of (inspired by Spanish) of Leroy meaning "the king" which derives from French le roi. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Elroi (English) Leroy (English) Leroi (English)