Clarence

Clarence was first created as the name of the title  of a dukedom for the second son of King Edward III, Lionel of Antwerp, in 1362. The name apparently came from the town of Clare, Suffolk, because his first wife was a direct descendant of the powerful de Clare family. Clare is a medieval English form of Clara, the Latin feminine form of Clarus which means “clear, bright, famous” from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to call, cry, summon). Clarence is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Klarence (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Clarencia (English)

 

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Valerian

Valerian comes from Roman cognomen Valerianus which comes from Latin valeo meaning “to be healthy, strong”, derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁- (to rule; strong, powerful). Valerian is also the name of a flower and an herb, as well as a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Valerius (Ancient Roman)
  • Valerianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Valérian (French)
  • Valère (French)
  • Walerian (Polish)
  • Walery (Polish)
  • Valeri (Bulgarian, Georgian, Russian)
  • Valeriy (Russian)
  • Valero (Spanish)
  • Valerio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Valério (Portuguese)
  • Valērijs (Latvian)
  • Valeriu (Romanian)
  • Valeriano (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Valeriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Valériane (French)
  • Valeria (Ancient Roman, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German)
  • Valerie (English, German, Czech)
  • Valérie (French, Czech)
  • Valera
  • Valeriane

 

Rufus

Rufus comes from an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “red, ruddy, red-haired”, originally a nickname for someone who had red hair. It comes from Latin rufus derived from the Proto-Indo-European root word *h₁rewdʰ- (red). Rufus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European.

Variants:

  • Rufinus (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufino (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Rufius (Ancient Roman)
  • Rufio (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Rufina (Ancient Roman, Spanish, Russian)
  • Rufia (English)

 

Cherie

Cherie comes from French chérie, a word which means “darling, sweetheart” from chérir (to cherish) derived from Latin cārus meaning “dear, beloved, expensive” via Proto-Indo-European *kéh₂ros (to desire, to wish). It may also be a variant spelling of Sherry, the name of a fortified wine in Spain called Xeres/Jerez, though Sherry is also a surname, the anglicized form of Irish Ó Searraigh meaning “descendant of Searrach”, the latter a given name meaning “colt, foal”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Chérie (French)
  • Cheri (English)
  • Cherri (English)
  • Cherilyn (English)
  • Sharilyn (English)
  • Sherilyn (English)
  • Sharyl (English)
  • Sheryl (English)
  • Sherryl (English)
  • Sheryll (English)
  • Sherill (English)
  • Sharalyn (English)
  • Cherette (English)
  • Cher (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Chéri (French)

 

Albany

Albany is the name of several cities and towns as well as once being an archaic name for a part of Scotland lying north of the River Forth (also known as Albania), derived from Gaelic Alba (which was the Scottish-Gaelic name for Scotland). The name may be derived from Latin albus meaning “white” from Proto-Indo-European *albos (white). Albany is also a surname.

Nicknames: Alb, Albie

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Albania (Latin)
  • Alban (Latin)
  • Alba (Latin)
  • Albion (Latin)
  • Albus (Latin)
  • Albaney (English)
  • Albanie (English)
  • Albanee (English)

Fiora

Fiora is derived from Italian fiore meaning “flower” which is derived from Latin florem via Proto-Italic *flōs (flower, blossom). Spelled Fíora it becomes an Irish word meaning “true” which comes from Old Irish fír (true, correct, real).

Origin: Proto-Italic, Old Irish

Variants:

  • Fiore (Italian) unisex
  • Fíora (Old Irish)

 

Male forms:

  • Fiore (Italian)
  • Fír (Old Irish)
  • Fíor (Old Irish)

 

Caledon

Caledon seems to be a shortened form of Caledonia, the old Latin name for Scotland in the northern part of Britain. Apparently the name is derived from a Pictish tribe in northern Scotland called the Caledonii which could be related to Proto-Celtic word *kaletos- meaning “hard/hardy, tough” from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard), perhaps in reference to the rocky land of the area or to the people. Caledon is also a surname derived from a place name, likely referring to someone who came from a town called Caledon.

Nicknames: Cal, Cale

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Female forms:

  • Caledonia

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)