K names, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names

Kirk

Kirk comes from an English and Scottish surname meaning "church", a topographic name for someone who lived near one. It comes from Old Norse kirkja (church) via Proto-Germanic *kirikǭ (church) which seems to be derived from Ancient Greek kuriakón (church) via kū́rios (lord) derived from PIE root word *keuə- (to swell, spread out, strong, powerful, prevail; vault, swell). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kirke (English)  

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Earth, Elements, G names, Male, Nature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Grant

Grant is a male given name which derives from an English and Scottish surname meaning "great, large" from Norman French graund (tall, large) via Latin grandis, grandem (large, great, grand; full-grown; full, abundant; powerful) derived from a PIE root word. Grant also comes from Old English personal Granta, of uncertain meaning though possibly derived from Old English granian meaning "to groan"… Continue reading Grant

Female, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, T names, Unisex, Word names

Thorn

Thorn comes from an English word referring to a sharp protective spine of a plant though it can also be used to refer to someone or something that is annoying or troublesome. It comes from Old English þorn (thorn; thorny bush) via Proto-Germanic *þurnuz (thorn, briar) derived from PIE root word *tr̥nós (sharp, stiff). Thorn is also an English surname, originating… Continue reading Thorn

C names, Elements, Female, Male, Nature, Proto-Germanic, Surname names, Unisex, Water, Word names

Cove

Cove refers to a small coastal inlet or a small, sheltered narrow bay. The origin of the word comes from Old English cofa (chamber; den; ark; cave) derived from Proto-Germanic *kubô (shed, hut). Cove is also a term in architecture which is used for a concave molding or a concave surface forming a junction between a ceiling and a… Continue reading Cove

A names, Color, Gold, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Auric

Auric comes from a term in chemistry, an adjective referring to something that is of or containing gold in the trivalent state. It comes from the Au, the chemical symbol for gold, which derives from Latin aurum meaning "gold" derived from a PIE root word. Of course, it's just as possible that Auric is made up from Au (gold) and ric, a… Continue reading Auric

Arthurian legends & myths, F names, Fairy, Female, Gaelic, Mythological creatures, Nature, Nickname names, Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Fay

Fay is a female given name which derives from several sources: the first is that it's another word for "fairy", coming from Middle English faie via Latin fata meaning "destiny, fate" derived from PIE root word *bʰeh₂- (to speak, say). In Arthurian legend, it's the epithet of Morgan le Fay (meaning Morgan the fairy); it's also been used as a nickname for… Continue reading Fay

Female, Irish, Latin, Male, Place names, Sabine/Oscan, Scottish, Surname names, T names, Unisex

Torrence

Torrence comes from a Scottish surname derived from a place name derived from Gaelic torran meaning "hillock" or "mound". It may also have derived from an Irish surname, Ó Toráin meaning "descendant of Torán", the latter an Irish male name meaning "little lord" or "little hero, champion" from Irish tor (lord, hero, champion) and the diminutive suffix -án. It's also possible… Continue reading Torrence

Female, Literature, Nature, P names, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Word names

Posey

Posey is a variant spelling of Posy, a shortened form of poesy which originally referred to a small bunch or a bouquet of flowers, or as an archaic word for a motto inscribed inside a ring. The word poesy means "poem" from Middle French poesie (poetry, poem) via Latin poesis (poem, poetry) derived from Ancient Greek poíēsis (poetry, poem; a creation) via poiein (to create, compose) derived from a… Continue reading Posey

Animals, D names, Elements, Gaelic, German/Germanic, Lion, Male, Mythology, Old English, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Water, Welsh mythology

Dillon

Dillon seems like a variant spelling of Dylan at first glance, an Irish name meaning "great tide" or "great flow" and the name of a sea god in Welsh mythology, but Dillon has its own roots. There seems to be a lot of contradictory information on it: it's an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Duilleáin meaning… Continue reading Dillon

Animals, Deer/Roe, Elements, Fox, Male, Nickname names, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Water, Word names

Rey

Rey is a Spanish male name (and word) meaning "king" derived from Latin rex (king, ruler) via a PIE *h₃rḗǵs (king, ruler) from root word *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, to right oneself; right; just). It could also be a short form of Reymundo, a variant spelling of Raymundo, the Spanish and Portuguese form of Raymond, the English form of Germanic Raginmund meaning “advice protector” or “counsel protector… Continue reading Rey

Emotion/Feelings, Female, Love/Beloved, Mythology, Proto-Indo-European, Roman mythology, Surname names, V names, Virtues/Attributes

Venus

Venus is the Roman goddess of love and sex and the Roman counterpart of Aphrodite. In Roman mythology, she is also the mother of the Roman people through her son Aeneas, an important figure in Greco-Roman mythology, who survived the fall of Troy and fled, eventually settling down in what would become the Roman empire and the ancestor… Continue reading Venus

Female, K names, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Kimberly

Kimberly in an English given name derived from a place name. The second element of the name comes from Old English leah meaning "wood, clearing, meadow" while the first part comes from Old English given names Cyneburga (royal fortress), Cynebald (royal, bold) or Cynemaer (royal, famous), so Kimberly means "Cyneburga's wood/clearing", "Cynebald's wood/clearing" or "Cynemaer's wood/clearing". It… Continue reading Kimberly

C names, Celtic, Gaulish/Celtic mythology, Male, Mythology, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Clyde

Clyde is an English male name of uncertain etymology. It derives from the River Clyde in Scotland though it could be derived from a Celtic word meaning "cleansing". It may also have gotten its name from the name of a Celtic goddess, Clota, who ruled over the River Clyde in Scotland. Origin: uncertain, perhaps Celtic Variants:… Continue reading Clyde

Female, H names, Male, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Unisex, Word names

Holly

Holly refers to a genus of shrubs or trees which comes from Old English holen, holegn (holly) which comes from Proto-Germanic *hulisaz (butcher's broom; holly) derived from  a PIE root word. Holly is also an Irish surname, an anglicized form of Mac Cuilinn meaning "son of Cuilinn", the latter derived from Irish cuilinn meaning "holly" also derived from the same origin as above;… Continue reading Holly

Animals, L names, Male, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Wolf

Lyle

Lyle is an English surname derived from Norman French l'isle meaning "the island", a topographical name for someone who lived or came from an island. It could also be derived as a habitional name for someone who came from a city in France called Lille, also derived from the source above. It comes from Latin insula (island), a word of… Continue reading Lyle

Animals, Birds, English, H names, Hawk, Male, Old English, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Word names

Hawk

Hawk refers to a group of predatory virds in the Accipitridae family. The name comes from Middle English hauk via Old English hafoc (hawk) from Proto-Germanic *habukaz (hawk) which seems to be derived from PIE root word *keh₂p- (to seize, to grab). As an English verb it's also used to refer to wares that are being peddled or advertised for sales. Hawk is also… Continue reading Hawk