Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

Advertisements

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning “Lord, have mercy”, the vocative form of Kyrios meaning “lord” or “master”. It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning “peel”, “skin” or “bark, rind” referring to the “bark of a tree” as well as an Indonesian and Malay word meaning “left”. Kiri is also a Maltese word meaning “hire” or “rental”, an Estonian word meaning “writing”, “letter”, “script”, as well as a Japanese female name meaning “pear tree” (樹梨) or “fog, mist” () though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s also the word for the paulownia tree (桐). Kyri is also a surname, likely derived from the Greek meaning of the name.

Origin: Greek, Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Kyrie (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Kiri (Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonia, Japanese, English)
  • Kyria (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Kyrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Kyriakos (Ancient Greek)

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Ganesh

Ganesh is a variant form of Ganesha, an Indian male name meaning “lord of the hordes” composed from Sanskrit gana (horde, multitude) and isha (lord, ruler). In Hindu mythology, Ganesh is the name of the Hindu god of good fortune, wisdom, and of gates and beginnings. He is depicted as having the head of an elephant and the body of a man.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Ganesha (Sanskrit)
  • Gaṇeśa (Sanskrit)
  • Ganesa
  • Ganapati
  • Vinayaka
  • Binayak

 

Poseidon

Poseidon was the Greek god of the sea, horses, storms and earthquakes in Greek mythology, and the brother of Zeus. Though the etymology behind the name is unclear, it could be derived from Greek posis (husband, lord) and da (earth) meaning “lord of the earth”.

Origin: Greek

 

Brandon

Brandon is from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

It could also be a various form of Brendan, an Irish name derived from Welsh brenin meaning “prince” from Celtic brigantinos meaning “king, prince”, “lord” or “high one”.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic, Old Norse, Celtic

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English)