Joyce

Joyce was originally a masculine name before becoming more popular for women. It derives from medieval masculine name Josse, the Old French form of Latin Iudocus which comes from Breton Judoc meaning "little lord" from Breton iudh (lord, chief, king) with the diminutive suffix -an. It derives from a Proto-Indo-European source. It later became associated with the Middle English word joise meaning "to rejoice". Joyce is also … Continue reading Joyce

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Donna

Donna comes from the Italian word meaning "woman," or "lady", used as a title of respect for the lady of the house. It derives from Latin domina (lady, mistress of the house) from a Proto-Indo-European source, either from *demh₂- (to tame, subdue) or from *dṓm (house, home) via root *dem- (to build). Donna could also be used as a feminine form of Donald, the … Continue reading Donna

Froy

Froy could be an anglicized form of Frøy, a Norwegian unisex name, the Norwegian form of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather. His name comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjaz meaning “lord”. Origin: Proto-Germanic Variants: Frøy (Norwegian) Fray (Norwegian) Frey Freyr   Female forms: Freya (Norse mythology, English) Freyja (Norse mythology, Icelandic) Freja (Danish, … Continue reading Froy

Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a … Continue reading Cerelia

Harisha

Harisha is an Indian male name meaning "lord of monkeys" made up from Sanskrit elements hari and isha (lord). In Sanskrit hari means "tawny, yellow, brown, green" which extends to animals of the same coloring such as a lion, horse, or monkey. It derives from a Proto-Indo-European source, *ǵʰelh₃- (to shine; to flourish; green, yellow). In Hindu mythology, Hari is another name for the gods Vishnu and Krishna. … Continue reading Harisha

Dominic

Dominic is the English form of Late Latin Dominicus meaning "of the Lord" from Latin dominus meaning "master, lord, ruler" derived from Proto-Indo-European *demh₂- (to tame, domesticate). It was traditionally given to a child born on a Sunday. Dominic is also a surname derived from the given name, Nicknames: Dom, Nic, Nicky/Nickie Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Domenic (English) Dominick (English) Dominicus (Late Latin, … Continue reading Dominic

Makana

Makana is a Hawaiian unisex name meaning "gift". It's also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as: "ten thousand; myriad + grant, answer" (万叶) "truth, reality; Buddhist sect + grant, answer" (眞叶) "truth, reality; Buddhist sect + love; affection, favorite" (真愛) "dance; flit; circle; wheel + … Continue reading Makana

Seraiah

Seraiah is a Hebrew male name meaning "Yahweh is ruler" or "Soldier/Prince of the Lord" and is the name of several figures in the Bible. Although a legitimate male name, it does have potential as a female name as well. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Seriah Serayah (English)  

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning "Lord, have mercy", the vocative form of Kyrios meaning "lord" or "master". It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning "peel", "skin" or "bark, rind" referring to the "bark of a tree" as well as an Indonesian and … Continue reading Kyri