Makana

Makana is a Hawaiian unisex name meaning “gift”. It’s also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • “ten thousand; myriad + grant, answer” (万叶)
  • “truth, reality; Buddhist sect + grant, answer” (眞叶)
  • “truth, reality; Buddhist sect + love; affection, favorite” (真愛)
  • “dance; flit; circle; wheel + play music; speak to a ruler; complete” (舞奏)
  • “truth, reality; Buddhist sect + play music; speak to a ruler; complete” (真奏)
  • “hemp; flax + love; affection; favorite” (麻愛)
  • “ten thousand + play music; speak to a ruler; complete” (万奏)

Written in hiragana it’s まかな (Makana).

Origin: Hawaiian, Japanese

 

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Seraiah

Seraiah is a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh is ruler” or “Soldier/Prince of the Lord” and is the name of several figures in the Bible. Although a legitimate male name, it does have potential as a female name as well.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Seriah
  • Serayah (English)

 

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning “Lord, have mercy”, the vocative form of Kyrios meaning “lord” or “master”. It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning “peel”, “skin” or “bark, rind” referring to the “bark of a tree” as well as an Indonesian and Malay word meaning “left”. Kiri is also a Maltese word meaning “hire” or “rental”, an Estonian word meaning “writing”, “letter”, “script”, as well as a Japanese female name meaning “pear tree” (樹梨) or “fog, mist” () though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s also the word for the paulownia tree (桐). Kyri is also a surname, likely derived from the Greek meaning of the name.

Origin: Greek, Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Kyrie (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Kiri (Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonia, Japanese, English)
  • Kyria (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Kyrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Kyriakos (Ancient Greek)

 

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Frey

Frey is a variant of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the twin brother of Freya, as well as the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak. His name comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjaz meaning “lord”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Freyr (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Frej (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frei

 

Female forms:

  • Freya (Norse mythology, English)
  • Freyja (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Freja (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frea (Norse mythology)
  • Frøya (Norwegian)

 

Ganesh

Ganesh is a variant form of Ganesha, an Indian male name meaning “lord of the hordes” composed from Sanskrit gana (horde, multitude) and isha (lord, ruler). In Hindu mythology, Ganesh is the name of the Hindu god of good fortune, wisdom, and of gates and beginnings. He is depicted as having the head of an elephant and the body of a man.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Ganesha (Sanskrit)
  • Gaṇeśa (Sanskrit)
  • Ganesa
  • Ganapati
  • Vinayaka
  • Binayak