Arthur

Arthur is the name of the legendary king of the Arthurian legends, the king of the Britons who defended against Saxon invaders. The meaning behind the name is unknown though it has often been linked to Celtic *artos meaning “bear” combined with rīxs meaning “king” meaning “bear king” or gwr (man) meaning “bear man”. The name may also be related to Artorius, a rare Roman family name of unknown etymology and meaning. Arthur is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Celtic

Variants:

  • Arturo (Italian, Spanish)
  • Artur (Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Polish, Russian, German, Estonian, Swedish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Artturi (Finnish)
  • Artúr (Hungarian)
  • Artūrs (Latvian)
  • Artūras (Lithunanian)
  • Artair (Scottish)

 

Female forms:

  • Arthuria (English)
  • Arthurina (English)
  • Arthurine (English, French)

 

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Gabrielle

Gabrielle is the French feminine form of Gabriel, which comes from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”.

Nicknames: Gabby, Brielle

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gabriella (Hungarian, Italian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gabriel (English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak)
  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Issachar

Issachar (pr. ee-sah-kahr; Forvo) comes from a Hebrew male name of uncertain etymology possibly meaning “man of hire” or “there is reward” from Hebrew shakhar (hire, wage, reward, recompense).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Yissachar (Hebrew)
  • Yissakhar (Hebrew)

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Alexander

Alexander is the Latinized form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” from Greek elements alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man). In Greek mythology, it was another name for the Trojan prince Paris, famous for abducting Helen, wife of Menelaus, which started the ten year Trojan war. It’s also the name of Alexander the Great, king of Macedon, who created one of the largest empires in the ancient world. Alexander is also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Alex, Xander, Lex, Ander, Sandy, Sander

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alexandros (Ancient Greek)
  • Aleksander (Polish, Slovene, Albanian, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Female forms:

  • Alexandra (Ancient Greek, English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Alexandria (English, Ancient Greek)
  • Alexandrina (Portuguese, English)
  • Aleksandra (Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Estonian)

 

Yutaka

Yutaka is a Japanese male name meaning “abundant, plentiful, rich” from Japanese 豊, though it has other meanings depending on the kanji used such as: “prosperous, rich” (); “excellent, outstanding, kind, tenderness” (優); “fertile, lush, abundant” ()“warm” (温); “male, excellent + tall, high, flying” (雄高); “tolerant” (); and other meanings depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Alexa

Alexa is a short form of Alexandra, the feminine form of Alexander, derived from Greek Alexandros meaning “defender of men” or “defending man” from Greek elements alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man). Alexandra was also an epithet for the Greek goddess Hera.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alexandra (Ancient Greek, English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Lexa (English)
  • Lexie (English)
  • Lexi (English)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars