Sigmund

Sigmund is the name of a hero in Norse mythology, the son of King Völsung. When his sister Signy marries Siggeir, king of Gautland, a wedding feast is held and the god Odin appears disguised as an old beggar. He plunges a sword into a tree, Barnstokkr, which stands in the center of King Völsung's hall, and whichever man is able to pull it … Continue reading Sigmund

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Andromeda

Andromeda was the name of an Ethiopian princess in Greek mythology, whose mother Cassiopeia's boast that her daughter was more beautiful than the Nereids (the daughters of the sea god Nereus) led to Poisedon sending the sea-monster Cetus to destroy the coast of Ethiopia for revenge. The only way to stop it was to chain Andromeda to a … Continue reading Andromeda

Andromache

Andromache (pr. an-dro-ma-kee) is the name of the wife of the Trojan hero Hector, making her a princess of Troy. The name comes from Ancient Greek aner (man) and mache (battle) either meaning "battle of man", "man's battle", or "fight like a man". When Troy was sacked, their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls and she as … Continue reading Andromache

Edmund

Edmund is an English male name made up from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches) and mund (protection) meaning "rich protection" or "wealthy protector". Ead comes from Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches) and mund also comes from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand; protection, security) derived from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand; man, human being). Edmund is the name of an antagonist in Shakespeare's King Lear (1603-1606). Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Eadmund (Anglo-Saxon) Edmond (French) … Continue reading Edmund

Maris

Maris is a female name taken from Latin meaning "of the sea" from Latin mare (sea) derived from Proto-Italic *mari (sea) from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). It comes from the Latin title stella maris "star of the sea" used for the Virgin Mary. Maris may also come from Latin mās meaning "male". Maris is also the name of an Etruscan god of agriculture and fertility, his … Continue reading Maris

Mark

Mark is the English form of Marcus, an Ancient Roman name which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. … Continue reading Mark

Cassandra

Cassandra comes from Ancient Greek of uncertain etymology. The second part of the name comes from aner (man) but the first part is a little less certain. It may possibly be derived from kekasmai (to excel, to shine) or Proto-Indo-European *(s)kand- (to glow, shine). In Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of King Priam of Troy who was given the gift … Continue reading Cassandra

Carroll

Carroll comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Cearbhall which may derived from Gaelic cearbh meaning "hacking", which may have been a byname for a butcher or a fierce warrior. Carroll could also be a variant spelling of Carol, either a shortened form of Caroline which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, though Carol is also an English word meaning "joyful … Continue reading Carroll

Herman

Herman is a male name made up of Germanic elements hari (army) and man (man) meaning "army man". It's also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Germanic Variants: Hermann (German) Hermanus (Dutch, Ancient Germanic) Hariman (Ancient Germanic) Hermanni (Finnish) Armand (French) Ármann (Icelandic) Armando (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese) Ermanno (Italian) German (Russian)