Xarles

Xarles is the Basque form of Charles which derives from Germanic Karl from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a free man. Origin: Proto-Germanic Variants: Charles (English, French)  

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Drew

Drew is used as a short form of Andrew, which is the English form of Greek male name Andreas, derived from Greek andreios meaning “manly, masculine”. It's also the anglicized form of Drogo, itself an Ancient Germanic personal name either derived from Gothic meaning "to bear", "to carry" or from an Old Saxon root meaning "ghost" or "phantom". Drew is also a surname … Continue reading Drew

Caro

Caro (pr. care-oh) is usually used as a short form of Caroline or Carolyn or any names beginning with caro-, both of which derive from Germanic Karl from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning “free man”, used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a free man. Caro may also be a … Continue reading Caro

Maraya

Maraya is a variant spelling of Mariah, itself a variant form of Maria which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, … Continue reading Maraya

Mario

Mario is the Italian and Spanish form of Marius, an Ancient Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning "male" or Latin mare meaning "sea". It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it's possible that Mars was … Continue reading Mario

Sigmund

Sigmund is the name of a hero in Norse mythology, the son of King Völsung. When his sister Signy marries Siggeir, king of Gautland, a wedding feast is held and the god Odin appears disguised as an old beggar. He plunges a sword into a tree, Barnstokkr, which stands in the center of King Völsung's hall, and whichever man is able to pull it … Continue reading Sigmund

Andromeda

Andromeda was the name of an Ethiopian princess in Greek mythology, whose mother Cassiopeia's boast that her daughter was more beautiful than the Nereids (the daughters of the sea god Nereus) led to Poisedon sending the sea-monster Cetus to destroy the coast of Ethiopia for revenge. The only way to stop it was to chain Andromeda to a … Continue reading Andromeda

Andromache

Andromache (pr. an-dro-ma-kee) is the name of the wife of the Trojan hero Hector, making her a princess of Troy. The name comes from Ancient Greek aner (man) and mache (battle) either meaning "battle of man", "man's battle", or "fight like a man". When Troy was sacked, their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls and she as … Continue reading Andromache

Edmund

Edmund is an English male name made up from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches) and mund (protection) meaning "rich protection" or "wealthy protector". Ead comes from Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches) and mund also comes from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand; protection, security) derived from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand; man, human being). Edmund is the name of an antagonist in Shakespeare's King Lear (1603-1606). Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Eadmund (Anglo-Saxon) Edmond (French) … Continue reading Edmund

Maris

Maris is a female name taken from Latin meaning "of the sea" from Latin mare (sea) derived from Proto-Italic *mari (sea) from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). It comes from the Latin title stella maris "star of the sea" used for the Virgin Mary. Maris may also come from Latin mās meaning "male". Maris is also the name of an Etruscan god of agriculture and fertility, his … Continue reading Maris